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Нобелевская премия 2021 по экономике присуждена за исследования экономики труда и причинных связей (24)

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Permanent Secretary of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Goran K Hansson, center, announces the 2021 Nobel prize for economics, flanked by members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Peter Fredriksson, left, and Eva Mork, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. From left on the screen above are the winners David Card of the University of California at Berkeley; Joshua Angrist from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. (Claudio Bresciani/TT via AP)
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From left, on the screen are the winners of the 2021 Nobel prize for economics; David Card of the University of California at Berkeley; Joshua Angrist from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Guido Imbens from Stanford University, announced during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. (Claudio Bresciani/TT via AP)
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Permanent Secretary of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Goran K Hansson, center, announces the 2021 Nobel prize for economics, flanked by members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Peter Fredriksson, left, and Eva Mork, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. From left on the screen above are the winners David Card of the University of California at Berkeley; Joshua Angrist from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. (Claudio Bresciani/TT via AP)
SWEDEN OUT
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Winner of the Nobel prize for economics Joshua Angrist holds his granddaughter Bella (no last name or age given) at his home Monday, Oct. 11, 2021, in Brookline, Mass. Angrist, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, shared the prize with David Card of the University of California at Berkeley and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. Angrist and Imbens won for their work on methods that allow economists to draw conclusions about cause and effect where studies cannot be carried out according to strict scientific methods. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)
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Winner of the Nobel prize for economics Joshua Angrist speaks to a reporter with his granddaughter Bella, and wife Mira Angrist, a professor of Hebrew at Boston University, from his home Monday, Oct. 11, 2021, in Brookline, Mass. Angrist, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, shared the prize with David Card of the University of California at Berkeley and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. Angrist and Imbens won for their work on methods that allow economists to draw conclusions about cause and effect where studies cannot be carried out according to strict scientific methods. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)
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Winner of the Nobel prize for economics Joshua Angrist arrives at his home Monday, Oct. 11, 2021, in Brookline, Mass. Angrist, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, shared the prize with David Card of the University of California at Berkeley and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. Angrist and Imbens won for their work on methods that allow economists to draw conclusions about cause and effect where studies cannot be carried out according to strict scientific methods. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)
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Winner of the Nobel prize for economics Joshua Angrist speaks to reporters at his home Monday, Oct. 11, 2021, in Brookline, Mass. Angrist, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, shared the prize with David Card of the University of California at Berkeley and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. Angrist and Imbens won for their work on methods that allow economists to draw conclusions about cause and effect where studies cannot be carried out according to strict scientific methods. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)
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From left, Winner of the Nobel prize for economics Joshua Angrist speaks to a reporter with his granddaughter Bella, and Wife Mira Angrist a professor of Hebrew at Boston University from his home Monday, Oct. 11, 2021, in Brookline, Mass. Angrist, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, shared the prize with David Card of the University of California at Berkeley and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. Angrist and Imbens won for their work on methods that allow economists to draw conclusions about cause and effect where studies cannot be carried out according to strict scientific methods. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)
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From left, Winner of the Nobel prize for economics Joshua Angrist speaks to a reporter with his granddaughter Bella, and Wife Mira Angrist a professor of Hebrew at Boston University from his home Monday, Oct. 11, 2021, in Brookline, Mass. Angrist, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, shared the prize with David Card of the University of California at Berkeley and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. Angrist and Imbens won for their work on methods that allow economists to draw conclusions about cause and effect where studies cannot be carried out according to strict scientific methods. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)
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In this still image from a video news conference, Joshua Angrist, one of the winners of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Economics, is joined by his granddaughter Bella, Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. Angrist, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Guido Imbens from Stanford University share the prize with David Card of the University of California, Berkeley. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology via AP)
AP PROVIDES ACCESS TO THIS THIRD PARTY PHOTO SOLELY TO ILLUSTRATE NEWS REPORTING OR COMMENTARY ON FACTS DEPICTED IN IMAGE; MUST BE USED WITHIN 14 DAYS FROM TRANSMISSION; NO ARCHIVING; NO LICENSING; MANDATORY CREDIT
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David Card, winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics, stands for a portrait in Berkeley, Calif., on Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. Card, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, received the award for his research on minimum wages and immigration. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)
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David Card, winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics, stands for a portrait in Berkeley, Calif., on Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. Card, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, received the award for his research on minimum wages and immigration. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)
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David Card, winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics, sits in his office in Berkeley, Calif., on Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. Card, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, received the award for his research on minimum wages and immigration. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)
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David Card, winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics, sits in his office in Berkeley, Calif., on Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. Card, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, received the award for his research on minimum wages and immigration. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)
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David Card, winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics, walks through University of California, Berkeley campus in Berkeley, Calif., on Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. Card received the award for his research on minimum wages and immigration. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)
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Goran K. Hansson (C), Permanent Secretary of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and Nobel Economics Prize committee members Peter Fredriksson (L) and Eva Mork (R) give a press conference to announce the winners of the 2021 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, on October 11, 2021. - Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens won the Nobel Economics Prize for insights into the labour market and "natural experiments", the jury said. (Photo by Claudio BRESCIANI / TT NEWS AGENCY / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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Goran K. Hansson (C), Permanent Secretary of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and Nobel Economics Prize committee members Peter Fredriksson (L) and Eva Mork (R) give a press conference to announce the winners of the 2021 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, on October 11, 2021. - Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens won the Nobel Economics Prize for insights into the labour market and "natural experiments", the jury said. (Photo by Claudio BRESCIANI / TT NEWS AGENCY / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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The winners of the 2021 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (L-R) David Card from the University of California, Berkeley, USA, Joshua D. Angrist from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA and Guido W. Imbens from the Stanford University, USA, are seen on a screen during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 11, 2021. - Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens won the Nobel Economics Prize for insights into the labour market and "natural experiments", the jury said. (Photo by Claudio BRESCIANI / TT NEWS AGENCY / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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Eva Mork, member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, explains research field of the winners of the 2021 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 11, 2021. - Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens won the Nobel Economics Prize for insights into the labour market and "natural experiments", the jury said. (Photo by Claudio BRESCIANI / TT NEWS AGENCY / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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In this photo received by AFP on October 11, 2021 by the Stanford Graduate School of Business, Professor Guido W. Imbens looks on in Standford, California. - Three US-based academics won the Nobel Economics Prize for research that "revolutionised" empirical work in their field and brought better understanding of how labour markets work, the jury said. Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens shared the prize for providing "new insights about the labour market" and showing "what conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn from natural experiments," the Nobel committee said in a statement. (Photo by Handout / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /Stanford Graduate School of Business/ HO " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /Stanford Graduate School of Business/ HO " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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In this photo received by AFP on October 11, 2021 by the MIT Department of Economics, Ford International Professor of Economics Joshua Angrist poses for a photo in Cambridge, Massachusets. - Three US-based academics won the Nobel Economics Prize for research that "revolutionised" empirical work in their field and brought better understanding of how labour markets work, the jury said. Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens shared the prize for providing "new insights about the labour market" and showing "what conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn from natural experiments," the Nobel committee said in a statement. (Photo by Handout / MIT Department of Economics / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /MIT Department of Economics / HO " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /MIT Department of Economics / HO " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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In this photo received by AFP on October 11, 2021 by the Stanford Graduate School of Business, Professor Guido W. Imbens poses for a photo in Standford, California. - Three US-based academics won the Nobel Economics Prize for research that "revolutionised" empirical work in their field and brought better understanding of how labour markets work, the jury said. Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens shared the prize for providing "new insights about the labour market" and showing "what conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn from natural experiments," the Nobel committee said in a statement. (Photo by Andrew Brodhead / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /Stanford Graduate School of Business/ Andrew BRODHEAD" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /Stanford Graduate School of Business/ Andrew BRODHEAD" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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In this photo received by AFP on October 11, 2021 by the University of California Berkeley, Professor David Card is seen. - Three US-based academics won the Nobel Economics Prize for research that "revolutionised" empirical work in their field and brought better understanding of how labour markets work, the jury said. Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens shared the prize for providing "new insights about the labour market" and showing "what conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn from natural experiments," the Nobel committee said in a statement. (Photo by Handout / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /University of California Berkeley/ HO" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /University of California Berkeley/ HO" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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(COMBO) This combination of pictures created on October 11, 2021 shows Photos received by AFP on October 11, 2021 by the Stanford Graduate School of Business, Professor Guido W. Imbens poses for a photo in Standford, California. In this photo received by AFP on October 11, 2021 by the MIT Department of Economics, Ford International Professor of Economics Joshua Angrist poses for a photo in Cambridge, Massachusets. In this photo received by AFP on October 11, 2021 by the University of California Berkeley, Professor David Card is seen. - Three US-based academics won the Nobel Economics Prize for research that "revolutionised" empirical work in their field and brought better understanding of how labour markets work, the jury said. Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens shared the prize for providing "new insights about the labour market" and showing "what conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn from natural experiments," the Nobel committee said in a statement. (Photos by Handout / various sources / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /Stanford Graduate School of Business, MIT Department of Economics, University of California Berkeley/ HO, Andrew BRODHEAD" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS /
SEE CAPTION FOR MORE INFORMATION / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /Stanford Graduate School of Business, MIT Department of Economics, University of California Berkeley/ HO, Andrew BRODHEAD" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAI