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Unfortunately, no trace of the electrical switchboard remains. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the p
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The exterior of one of the administrative buildings. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant
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Nuclear symbols are located all throughout the plant. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plan
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At first, the radiation is relatively low. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which inc
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Nuclear waste storage drums. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included a rare t
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Porcelain tableware emblazoned with the power plant?s logo. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the powe
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Operating one of the control panels. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included
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One of the plant's control panel rooms. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which includ
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Concrete modules used to store the canisters. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which
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The exterior of the plant. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included a rare tou
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Changing shoes before entering the dirty zone. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which
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Dark concrete tunnels run through the plant lined with electrical cables. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access i
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The fuel assemblies. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included a rare tour insi
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Miles and miles of pipes and electrical cables are visible everywhere. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access insi
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Underground bunker in the basement of BK-2. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which in
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Room 101/3: the electrical switchboard. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which includ
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Electrical cables line the corridors. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included
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The old sarcophagus. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included a rare tour insi
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The plant's electronic workshop. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included a ra
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View from the roof of BK-2 towards Unit 3. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which inc
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Smashed office clocks in one of the rooms in BK-2. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant w
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Human radiation spectrometer test before and after visiting the power plant to determine the body?s radionuclide content. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nucle
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Telephone switchboard in one of the offices in BK-2. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant
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Stairs leading to all levels of the old sarcophagus. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant
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An old abandoned staff area. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included a rare t
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A dosimetry check after leaving the complex. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which i
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TOPSHOT - A man, wearing a protective face mask amid the Covid-19 pandemic, walk at Chernobyl's memorial in Kiev to commemorate the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident, on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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TOPSHOT - A liquidator of Chernobyl nuclear power plant kneels to pay his respects at Chernobyl's memorial in Kiev during the commemoration of the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident, on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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TOPSHOT - Women wearing black clothing and face masks with radioactivity sign march under umbrellas in Minsk, on April 26, 2021, to commemorate the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the tragedy. (Photo by - / AFP)
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Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko speaks with local residents in the town of Bragin, some 360 km ( 225 miles) south-east of Minsk, Belarus, Monday, April 26, 2021. Alexander Lukashenko took part in a requiem rally on the occasion of the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster. (Maxim Guchek/BelTA Pool Photo via AP)
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Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko, accompanied by officials, attends a requiem rally on the occasion of the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster in the town of Bragin, some 360 km (225 miles) south-east of Minsk, Belarus, Monday, April 26, 2021. (Sergei Sheleg/BelTA Pool Photo via AP)
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Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko speaks with local residents in the town of Bragin, some 360 km ( 225 miles) south-east of Minsk, Belarus, Monday, April 26, 2021. Alexander Lukashenko took part in a requiem rally on the occasion of the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster. (Sergei Sheleg/BelTA Pool Photo via AP)
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Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko speaks with local residents in the town of Bragin, some 360 km ( 225 miles) south-east of Minsk, Belarus, Monday, April 26, 2021. Alexander Lukashenko took part in a requiem rally on the occasion of the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster. (Sergei Sheleg/BelTA Pool Photo via AP)
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A woman in a Ukrainian folk costume lays flowers to the Chernobyl victims monument in capital Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, April 26, 2021. April 26 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. A reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded on April 26, 1986, leading to an explosion and the subsequent fire spewed a radioactive plume over much of northern Europe. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
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A Ukrainian army general lays flowers to the Chernobyl victims monument in capital Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, April 26, 2021. April 26 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. A reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded on April 26, 1986, leading to an explosion and the subsequent fire spewed a radioactive plume over much of northern Europe. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
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Ukrainian honor guards stand to attention near the monument erected in memory of the victims of the Chernobyl explosion in Ukraine's capital Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, April 26, 2021. April 26 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. A reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded on April 26, 1986, leading to an explosion and the subsequent fire spewed a radioactive plume over much of northern Europe. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
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A clean-up operation veteran wearing a face mask to protect against coronavirus pays respect to the Chernobyl firefighters at a memorial in capital Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, April 26, 2021. April 26 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. A reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded on April 26, 1986, leading to an explosion and the subsequent fire spewed a radioactive plume over much of northern Europe. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
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Guards of Honor march to lay a flower wreath at Chernobyl's victim monument in Ukraine's capital Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, April 26, 2021. April 26 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. A reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded on April 26, 1986, leading to an explosion and the subsequent fire spewed a radioactive plume over much of northern Europe. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
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Russian Emergency Ministry Soldiers attend a wreath-laying ceremony at Mitino Memorial to commemorate those who died after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Moscow, Russia, Monday, April 26, 2021, on the 35th anniversary of the explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear plant. About 600,000 people, often referred to as Chernobyl's "liquidators," were sent in to fight the fire at the nuclear plant after an explosion on April 26, 1986. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)
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A Russian veteran fire fighter lays flowers at the Mitino Memorial to commemorate those who died after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Moscow, Russia, Monday, April 26, 2021, on the 35th anniversary of the explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear plant. About 600,000 people, often referred to as Chernobyl's "liquidators," were sent in to fight the fire at the nuclear plant after an explosion on April 26, 1986. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)
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A Russian veteran fire fighter walks after laiyng flowers at the Mitino Memorial to commemorate those who died after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Moscow, Russia, Monday, April 26, 2021, on the 35th anniversary of the explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear plant. About 600,000 people, often referred to as Chernobyl's "liquidators," were sent in to fight the fire at the nuclear plant after an explosion on April 26, 1986. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)
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Russian veteran fire fighters lay flowers at the Mitino Memorial to commemorate those who died after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Moscow, Russia, Monday, April 26, 2021, on the 35th anniversary of the explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear plant. About 600,000 people, often referred to as Chernobyl's "liquidators," were sent in to fight the fire at the nuclear plant after an explosion on April 26, 1986. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)
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A man reacts at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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People light candles on the central square of the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on early April 26, 2021, to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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People light candles on the central square of the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on early April 26, 2021, to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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People light candles on the central square of the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on early April 26, 2021, to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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People gather on the central square of the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant early on April 26, 2021, to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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An orthodox priest lights candles on the central square of the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant early on April 26, 2021, to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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People stand next to lit candles on the central square of the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on early April 26, 2021, to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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Orthodox priests hold a commemoration service on the central square of the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant early on April 26, 2021, to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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People light candles on the central square of the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on early April 26, 2021, to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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An abandoned building is seen in the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant early on April 26, 2021, during an event to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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An exhibition of photographs by Denys Kopylov is seen at an abandoned building on the central square of the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant early on April 26, 2021, during an event to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION
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People stand next to lit candles on the central square of the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on early April 26, 2021, to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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An abandoned building is seen in the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant early on April 26, 2021, during an event to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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Women wearing black clothing and face masks with radioactivity sign march under umbrellas in Minsk, on April 26, 2021, to commemorate the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the tragedy. (Photo by STRINGER / AFP)
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Women wearing black clothing and face masks with radioactivity sign march under umbrellas in Minsk, on April 26, 2021, to commemorate the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the tragedy. (Photo by - / AFP)
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A woman wearing black clothing and face masks with radioactivity sign marches under an umbrella in Minsk, on April 26, 2021, to commemorate the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the tragedy. (Photo by - / AFP)
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People, wearing protective face masks amid the Covid-19 pandemic, stand at Chernobyl's memorial in Kiev to commemorate the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident, on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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People, wearing protective face masks amid the Covid-19 pandemic, stand at Chernobyl's memorial in Kiev to commemorate the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident, on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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A man, wearing a protective face mask amid the Covid-19 pandemic, walk at Chernobyl's memorial in Kiev to commemorate the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident, on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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A liquidator of Chernobyl nuclear power plant reacts at Chernobyl's memorial in Kiev during the commemoration of the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident, on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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A liquidator of Chernobyl nuclear power plant reacts at Chernobyl's memorial in Kiev during the commemoration of the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident, on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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A liquidator of Chernobyl nuclear power plant kneels to pay his respects at Chernobyl's memorial in Kiev during the commemoration of the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident, on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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A liquidator of Chernobyl nuclear power plant smiles as he talks with former colleagues at Chernobyl's memorial in Kiev during the commemoration of the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident, on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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A liquidator of Chernobyl nuclear power plant kneels to pay his respects at Chernobyl's memorial in Kiev during the commemoration of the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident, on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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Liquidators of Chernobyl nuclear power plant and the Orthodox priests attend to pay to pay his respects at Chernobyl's memorial in Kiev during the commemoration of the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident, on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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People wearing traditional Ukrainian clothes carry flowers to pay to pay his respects at Chernobyl's memorial in Kiev during the commemoration of the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident, on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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People gather to pay their respects at Chernobyl's memorial in Kiev during the commemoration of the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident, on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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A liquidator of Chernobyl nuclear power plant straightens his face mask at Chernobyl's memorial in Kiev during the commemoration of the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident, on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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This handout picture taken and released by the Ukrainian Presidential Press Service on April 26, 2021 shows the President Volodymyr Zelensky laying flowers at the foot of monument commemorating the victims of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster, near Chernobyl. - Zelensky on April 26, 2021, urged the international community to work together to ensure nuclear security and prevent a repeat of the Chernobyl disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Handout / UKRAINIAN PRESIDENTIAL PRESS SERVICE / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /Ukrainian Presidential Press Service " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /Ukrainian Presidential Press Service " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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This handout picture taken and released by the Ukrainian Presidential Press Service on April 26, 2021 shows the President Volodymyr Zelensky laying flowers at the foot of monument commemorating the victims of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster, near Chernobyl. - Zelensky on April 26, 2021, urged the international community to work together to ensure nuclear security and prevent a repeat of the Chernobyl disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by STR / UKRAINIAN PRESIDENTIAL PRESS SERVICE / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /Ukrainian Presidential Press Service " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /Ukrainian Presidential Press Service " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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This handout picture taken and released by the Ukrainian Presidential Press Service on April 26, 2021 shows the President Volodymyr Zelensky laying flowers at the foot of monument commemorating the victims of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster, near Chernobyl. - Zelensky on April 26, 2021, urged the international community to work together to ensure nuclear security and prevent a repeat of the Chernobyl disaster on the 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by STR / UKRAINIAN PRESIDENTIAL PRESS SERVICE / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /Ukrainian Presidential Press Service " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /Ukrainian Presidential Press Service " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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KIEV, UKRAINE - APRIL 26: (----EDITORIAL USE ONLY ??" MANDATORY CREDIT - "UKRAINIAN PRESIDENCY / HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS----) Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky makes a press statement as he attends the event to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Kiev, Ukraine on April 26, 2021. Ukrainian Presidency / Handout / Anadolu Agency/ABACAPRESS.COM
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EN_01474376_0023
KIEV, UKRAINE - APRIL 26: (----EDITORIAL USE ONLY ??" MANDATORY CREDIT - "UKRAINIAN PRESIDENCY / HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS----) Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky makes a press statement as he attends the event to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Kiev, Ukraine on April 26, 2021. Ukrainian Presidency / Handout / Anadolu Agency/ABACAPRESS.COM
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KIEV, UKRAINE - APRIL 26: (----EDITORIAL USE ONLY ??" MANDATORY CREDIT - "UKRAINIAN PRESIDENCY / HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS----) Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky (C) makes a press statement as he attends the event to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Kiev, Ukraine on April 26, 2021. Ukrainian Presidency / Handout / Anadolu Agency/ABACAPRESS.COM
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KIEV, UKRAINE - APRIL 26: (----EDITORIAL USE ONLY ??" MANDATORY CREDIT - "UKRAINIAN PRESIDENCY / HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS----) Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky attends the event to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Kiev, Ukraine on April 26, 2021. Ukrainian Presidency / Handout / Anadolu Agency/ABACAPRESS.COM
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KIEV, UKRAINE - APRIL 26: (----EDITORIAL USE ONLY ??" MANDATORY CREDIT - "UKRAINIAN PRESIDENCY / HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS----) Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky (R) attends the event to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Kiev, Ukraine on April 26, 2021. Ukrainian Presidency / Handout / Anadolu Agency/ABACAPRESS.COM
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KIEV, UKRAINE - APRIL 26: (----EDITORIAL USE ONLY ??" MANDATORY CREDIT - "UKRAINIAN PRESIDENCY / HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS----) Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky and Ukrainian officials lay flowers on a monument during the event to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Kiev, Ukraine on April 26, 2021. Ukrainian Presidency / Handout / Anadolu Agency/ABACAPRESS.COM
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KIEV, UKRAINE - APRIL 26: (----EDITORIAL USE ONLY ??" MANDATORY CREDIT - "UKRAINIAN PRESIDENCY / HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS----) Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky attends the event to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Kiev, Ukraine on April 26, 2021. Ukrainian Presidency / Handout / Anadolu Agency/ABACAPRESS.COM
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EN_01474376_0029
KIEV, UKRAINE - APRIL 26: (----EDITORIAL USE ONLY ??" MANDATORY CREDIT - "UKRAINIAN PRESIDENCY / HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS----) Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky lays flowers on a monument as he attends the event to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Kiev, Ukraine on April 26, 2021. Ukrainian Presidency / Handout / Anadolu Agency/ABACAPRESS.COM
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KIEV, UKRAINE - APRIL 26: (----EDITORIAL USE ONLY ??" MANDATORY CREDIT - "UKRAINIAN PRESIDENCY / HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS----) Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky attends the event to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Kiev, Ukraine on April 26, 2021. Ukrainian Presidency / Handout / Anadolu Agency/ABACAPRESS.COM
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TOPSHOT - A Chernobyl plant employee lights candles and lays flowers at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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TOPSHOT - A Chernobyl plant employee holds candle near radioactivity sign at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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TOPSHOT - Chernobyl plant employees carry candles near radioactivity sign at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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A Chernobyl plant employee lights candles and lays flowers at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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Chernobyl plant employee lights candles and lays flowers at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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Chernobyl plant employee lights candles and lays flowers at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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Chernobyl plant employee lights candles and lays flowers at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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Chernobyl plant employee lights candles and lays flowers at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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A woman lights candles at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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A kneeling woman reacts at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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A kneeling woman reacts at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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People hold candles at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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People hold candles at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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A Chernobyl plant employee holds candle near radioactivity sign at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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Chernobyl plant employees carry candles near radioactivity sign at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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A man lights a candle at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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A woman and her daughter light a candle at the monument to Chernobyl victims in Slavutych, the city where the power station's personnel lived, some 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the accident site on April 25, 2021, during a memorial ceremony amid the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. - Ukraine on April 26, 2021 marks the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster which was the world's worst nuclear accident. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)
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People gather on the central square of the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant early on April 26, 2021, to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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A visitor takes a photo of an abandoned building in the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant early on April 26, 2021, during an event to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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People stand in front of an exhibition of photographs of Denys Kopylov on central square of the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant early on April 26, 2021, during an event to commemorate 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION
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People stand in front of an exhibition of photographs of Denys Kopylov on central square of the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant early on April 26, 2021, during an event to commemorate 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION
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A visitor looks at a rusty machinery which was involved in the recovery works following the accident at the Chernobyl power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat on April 24, 2021. - The 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster will be commemorated in the ex-Soviet country on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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People walk past the disused Soviet-build over-the-horizon radar (OTH) system "Duga-1" near Chernobyl on April 24, 2021. - The 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster will be commemorated in the ex-Soviet country on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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People stand at the bottom of the disused Soviet-build over-the-horizon radar (OTH) system "Duga-1" near Chernobyl during a visit on April 24, 2021. - The 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster will be commemorated in the ex-Soviet country on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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People stand at the bottom of the disused Soviet-build over-the-horizon radar (OTH) system "Duga-1" near Chernobyl during a visit on April 24, 2021. - The 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster will be commemorated in the ex-Soviet country on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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A woman takes pictures at the bottom of the disused Soviet-build over-the-horizon radar (OTH) system "Duga-1" near Chernobyl during a visit on April 24, 2021. - The 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster will be commemorated in the ex-Soviet country on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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People take pictures at the bottom of the disused Soviet-build over-the-horizon radar (OTH) system "Duga-1" near Chernobyl during a visit on April 24, 2021. - The 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster will be commemorated in the ex-Soviet country on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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A man takes pictures at the bottom of the disused Soviet-build over-the-horizon radar (OTH) system "Duga-1" near Chernobyl during a visit on April 24, 2021. - The 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster will be commemorated in the ex-Soviet country on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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Buses with visitors wait at the Dytiatky control point to enter the Chernobyl exclusion zone on April 24, 2021. - The 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster will be commemorated in the ex-Soviet country on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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A visitor looks at a rusty tank which was involved in the recovery works following the accident at the Chernobyl power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat on April 24, 2021. - The 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster will be commemorated in the ex-Soviet country on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)
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Workers walk past the covered exploded reactor inside a shelter construction at the Chernobyl nuclear plant, in Chernobyl, Ukraine, Thursday, April 15, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
photo taken on Thursday, April 15, 2021
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An abandoned carousel in the park is seen the ghost town of Pripyat close to the Chernobyl nuclear plant, Ukraine, Thursday, April 15, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
photo taken on Thursday, April 15, 2021
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The rusty emblem of the Soviet Union is seen over the ghost town of Pripyat close to the Chernobyl nuclear plant, Ukraine, Thursday, April 15, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
photo taken with a drone on Thursday, April 15, 2021
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The rusty emblem of the Soviet Union is seen on the roof of an apartment building in the ghost town of Pripyat close to the Chernobyl nuclear plant, Ukraine, Thursday, April 15, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
photo taken with a drone on Thursday, April 15, 2021
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A man walks past a shelter covering the exploded reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear plant, in Chernobyl, Ukraine, Thursday, April 15, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
photo taken on Thursday, April 15, 2021
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A view of the ghost town of Pripyat with a shelter covering the exploded reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear plant in the background, Ukraine, Thursday, April 15, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
photo taken with a drone on Thursday, April 15, 2021
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Yevgeny Markevich, an 85-year-old former teacher, repairs a boat near his house at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 14, 2021. Markevich said "It's a great happiness to live at home, but it's sad that it's not as it used to be." Today, he grows potatoes and cucumbers on his garden plot, which he takes for tests "in order to partially protect myself." The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)
photo taken on Wednesday, April 14, 2021
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Yevgeny Markevich, 85-year-old former teacher speaks to his dog as he prepares to drive at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 14, 2021. Markevich said "It's a great happiness to live at home, but it's sad that it's not as it used to be." Today, he grows potatoes and cucumbers on his garden plot, which he takes for tests "in order to partially protect myself." The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)
photo taken on Wednesday, April 14, 2021
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Yevgeny Markevich, a 85-year-old former teacher, smiles smiles during his interview with the Associated Press at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 14, 2021. Markevich said "It's a great happiness to live at home, but it's sad that it's not as it used to be." Today, he grows potatoes and cucumbers on his garden plot, which he takes for tests "in order to partially protect myself." The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)
photo taken on Wednesday, April 14, 2021
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Yevgeny Markevich, a 85-year-old former teacher, leaves his house at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 14, 2021. Markevich said "It's a great happiness to live at home, but it's sad that it's not as it used to be." Today, he grows potatoes and cucumbers on his garden plot, which he takes for tests "in order to partially protect myself." The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)
photo taken on Wednesday, April 14, 2021
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Denis Vishnevskiy, chief of the unit of the Chernobyl Radiation and Ecological Biosphere Reserve, speaks during his interview with the Associated Press at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 13, 2021. "This is a gigantic territory in which we keep a chronicle of nature," said Denis Vishnevskiy, 43, who has been observing nature in the reserve for the past 20 years. "The exclusion zone is not a curse, but our resource." The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)
photo taken on Tuesday, April 13, 2021
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Denis Vishnevskiy, chief of the unit of the Chernobyl Radiation and Ecological Biosphere Reserve, foreground right, and his colleagues carry a box with a beaver preparing to release it into a forest at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 13, 2021. To the surprise of many who expected the area might be a dead zone for centuries, wildlife is thriving: bears, bison, wolves, lynx, wild horses and dozens of bird species. According to scientists, the animals were much more resistant to radiation than expected, and were able to quickly adapt to strong radiation. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)
photo taken on Tuesday, April 13, 2021
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Deer are seen in a forest at the Chernobyl Radiation and Ecological Biosphere Reserve exclusion zone, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 13, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)
photo taken on Tuesday, April 13, 2021
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Abandoned country houses are seen at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 13, 2021. The Ukrainian authorities are calling for the exclusion zone of objects to be included in the UNESCO World Heritage List, since the object is a unique place "of interest to all mankind". The Ministry of Culture of Ukraine has already taken steps to recognize the zone as a monument, which will attract more funding and tourists. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)
photo taken on Tuesday, April 13, 2021
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An abandoned village house and outbuildings are seen at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 13, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)
photo taken with a drone on Tuesday, April 13, 2021
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Denis Vishnevskiy, chief of the unit of the Chernobyl Radiation and Ecological Biosphere Reserve looks through binoculars in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 13, 2021. "This is a gigantic territory in which we keep a chronicle of nature," said Denis Vishnevskiy, 43, who has been observing nature in the reserve for the past 20 years. "The exclusion zone is not a curse, but our resource ". The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)
photo taken on Tuesday, April 13, 2021

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