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Нобелевская премия 2020 по химии присуждена за разработку метода редактирования генома (137)

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A file photo shows Jennifer Doudna (L), professor of University of California, and Emmanuelle Charpentier, Max Planck Institute Director, holding a model of "CRISPR-Cas9" in Tokyo on Feb. 3, 2017, after awarding Japan Prize. Doudna of United States and Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Jennifer Doudna (R), professor of University of California, and Emmanuelle Charpentier, Max Planck Institute Director, in Tokyo on Feb. 2, 2017, after awarding Japan Prize. Doudna of United States and Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Emmanuelle Charpentier, Max Planck Institute Director, speaking during an interview in Tokyo on Feb. 3, 2017, after awarding Japan Prize. Jennifer Doudna of United States and Emmanuelle Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Emmanuelle Charpentier, Max Planck Institute Director, speaking during an interview in Tokyo on Feb. 3, 2017, after awarding Japan Prize. Jennifer Doudna of United States and Emmanuelle Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Jennifer Doudna (L), professor of University of California, and Emmanuelle Charpentier, Max Planck Institute Director, in Tokyo on Feb. 3, 2017, after awarding Japan Prize. Doudna of United States and Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Jennifer Doudna , professor of University of California, speaking during an interview in Tokyo on Feb. 3, 2017, after awarding Japan Prize. Jennifer Doudna of United States and Emmanuelle Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Jennifer Doudna , professor of University of California, speaking during an interview in Tokyo on Feb. 3, 2017, after awarding Japan Prize. Jennifer Doudna of United States and Emmanuelle Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Emmanuelle Charpentier, Max Planck Institute Director, attending Japan Prize Award Ceremony in Tokyo on April 19, 2017. Jennifer Doudna of United States and Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Emmanuelle Charpentier, Max Planck Institute Director, attending Japan Prize Award Ceremony in Tokyo on April 19, 2017. Jennifer Doudna of United States and Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Emmanuelle Charpentier, Max Planck Institute Director, attending Japan Prize Award Ceremony in Tokyo on April 19, 2017. Jennifer Doudna of United States and Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Jennifer Doudna, professor of University of California, speaking during an interview in Tokyo on Feb. 3, 2017, after awarding Japan Prize. Jennifer Doudna of United States and Emmanuelle Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Jennifer Doudna, professor of University of California, speaking during an interview in Tokyo on Feb. 3, 2017, after awarding Japan Prize. Jennifer Doudna of United States and Emmanuelle Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Jennifer Doudna (L), professor of University of California, and Emmanuelle Charpentier, Max Planck Institute Director, in Tokyo on Feb. 3, 2017, after awarding Japan Prize. Doudna of United States and Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Jennifer Doudna , professor of University of California, attending Japan Prize Award Ceremony in Tokyo on April 19, 2017. Jennifer Doudna of United States and Emmanuelle Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Jennifer Doudna , professor of University of California, attending Japan Prize Award Ceremony in Tokyo on April 19, 2017. Jennifer Doudna of United States and Emmanuelle Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Jennifer Doudna , professor of University of California, attending Japan Prize Award Ceremony in Tokyo on April 19, 2017. Jennifer Doudna of United States and Emmanuelle Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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A file photo shows Jennifer Doudna , professor of University of California, attending Japan Prize Award Ceremony in Tokyo on April 19, 2017. Jennifer Doudna of United States and Emmanuelle Charpentier of France won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for contributing to development of the gene-editing technique known as the "CRISPR-Cas9" (Crisper Casnine) on Sep. 7, 2020. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
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(201007) -- STOCKHOLM, Oct. 7, 2020 (Xinhua) -- Photo taken on Oct. 7, 2020 shows the announcement of the two laureates of the 2020 Nobel Prize at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Chemistry in Stockholm, Sweden. The 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to two scientists for their discovery on genome editing, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced on Wednesday. The prize went to Emmanuelle Charpentier with the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens in Germany and Jennifer A. Doudna from the University of California, Berkeley "for the development of a method for genome editing," according to a press release from the academy. (Photo by Wei Xuechao/Xinhua)
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(201007) -- STOCKHOLM, Oct. 7, 2020 (Xinhua) -- Emmanuelle Charpentier, one of the two 2020 Nobel laureates in Chemistry, is seen on screen when she answers questions through telephone interview after the prize announcement at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on Oct. 7, 2020. The 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to two scientists for their discovery on genome editing, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced on Wednesday. The prize went to Emmanuelle Charpentier with the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens in Germany and Jennifer A. Doudna from the University of California, Berkeley "for the development of a method for genome editing," according to a press release from the academy. (Photo by Wei Xuechao/Xinhua)
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(201007) -- STOCKHOLM, Oct. 7, 2020 (Xinhua) -- Claes Gustafsson (R), chairman of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry, explains the achievements of the 2020 Nobel laureates in Chemistry during the prize announcement at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on Oct. 7, 2020. The 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to two scientists for their discovery on genome editing, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced on Wednesday. The prize went to Emmanuelle Charpentier with the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens in Germany and Jennifer A. Doudna from the University of California, Berkeley "for the development of a method for genome editing," according to a press release from the academy. (Photo by Wei Xuechao/Xinhua)
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(201007) -- STOCKHOLM, Oct. 7, 2020 (Xinhua) -- Laureates of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna, are seen on screen during the prize announcement in Stockholm, Sweden, on Oct. 7, 2020. The 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to two scientists for their discovery on genome editing, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced on Wednesday. The prize went to Emmanuelle Charpentier with the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens in Germany and Jennifer A. Doudna from the University of California, Berkeley "for the development of a method for genome editing," according to a press release from the academy. (Photo by Wei Xuechao/Xinhua)
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(201008) -- BEIJING, Oct. 8, 2020 (Xinhua) -- Photo taken on Oct. 7, 2020 shows the announcement of the two laureates of the 2020 Nobel Prize at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Chemistry in Stockholm, Sweden. (Photo by Wei Xuechao/Xinhua)
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FILE - This Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2015 file combo image shows Emmanuelle Charpentier, left, and Jennifer Doudna, both speaking at the National Academy of Sciences international summit on the safety and ethics of human gene editing, in Washington. The 2020 Nobel Prize for chemistry has been awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna ??sfor the development of a method for genome editing.??? A panel at the Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm made the announcement Wednesday Oct. 7, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
COMBINATION IMAGE TUESDAY, DEC. 1, 2015 FILE PHOTOS
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Goran K. Hansson, Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences, right, announces the winners of the 2020 Nobel prize in Chemistry during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Wednesday Oct. 7, 2020. The 2020 Nobel Prize for chemistry has been awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier, left on screen, and Jennifer Doudna ??sfor the development of a method for genome editing.??? (Henrik Montgomery/TT via AP)
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Professor Pernilla Wittung Stafshede, left, and Goran K. Hansson, Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences, after announcing the winners of the 2020 Nobel prize in Chemistry during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Wednesday Oct. 7, 2020. The 2020 Nobel Prize for chemistry has been awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier, left on screen, and Jennifer Doudna ??sfor the development of a method for genome editing.??? (Henrik Montgomery/TT via AP)
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French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier poses near a statue of Max Planck in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to 'molecular scissors' that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
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French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier poses near a statue of Max Planck in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to 'molecular scissors' that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
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French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier poses near a statue of Max Planck in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to 'molecular scissors' that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
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French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier poses near a statue of Max Planck in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to 'molecular scissors' that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
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French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier poses near a statue of Max Planck in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to 'molecular scissors' that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber), APTOPIX
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French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier poses for photos in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to 'molecular scissors' that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
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French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier poses with a figure with a Swedish flag in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to 'molecular scissors' that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
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French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier poses with a figure with a Swedish flag in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to 'molecular scissors' that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
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French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier poses near a statue of Max Planck in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to 'molecular scissors' that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
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File photo taken in April 2017 shows Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and Jennifer Doudna giving an interview in Tokyo. The two won the 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry for discovering a revolutionary genome editing technique. (Kyodo via AP Images) ==Kyodo
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File photo in April 2017 shows Emmanuelle Charpentier giving an interview in Tokyo. The director of the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens in Berlin won the 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry with Jennifer Doudna for discovering a revolutionary genome editing technique. (Kyodo via AP Images) ==Kyodo
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File photo taken in April 2017 shows Jennifer Doudna giving an interview in Tokyo. The professor at the University of California, Berkeley, won the 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry with Emmanuelle Charpentier for discovering a revolutionary genome editing technique. (Kyodo via AP Images) ==Kyodo
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French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier poses for a photo in the lobby of the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to 'molecular scissors' that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases.(AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
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Emmanuelle Charpentier, Director, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, and Honorary Professor at Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany, seen here in an image released to the media by her department. Emmanuelle is one of the winners of the The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2020 for her work on the discovery of for the development of a method for genome editing. (Photo by Hallbauer&Fioretti/Emmanuelle Charpentier via Sipa USA) ***EDITORIAL USE ONLY**MANDATORY CREDIT**IMAGE MUST BE USED IN CONTEXT OF STORY***
***EDITORIAL USE ONLY**MANDATORY CREDIT**IMAGE MUST BE USED IN CONTEXT OF STORY***
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Emmanuelle Charpentier, Director, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, and Honorary Professor at Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany, seen here in an image released to the media by her department. Emmanuelle is one of the winners of the The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2020 for her work on the discovery of for the development of a method for genome editing. (Photo by Hallbauer&Fioretti/Emmanuelle Charpentier via Sipa USA) ***EDITORIAL USE ONLY**MANDATORY CREDIT**IMAGE MUST BE USED IN CONTEXT OF STORY***
***EDITORIAL USE ONLY**MANDATORY CREDIT**IMAGE MUST BE USED IN CONTEXT OF STORY***
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Emmanuelle Charpentier, Director, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, and Honorary Professor at Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany, seen here in an image released to the media by her department. Emmanuelle is one of the winners of the The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2020 for her work on the discovery of for the development of a method for genome editing. (Photo by Hallbauer&Fioretti/Emmanuelle Charpentier via Sipa USA) ***EDITORIAL USE ONLY**MANDATORY CREDIT**IMAGE MUST BE USED IN CONTEXT OF STORY***
***EDITORIAL USE ONLY**MANDATORY CREDIT**IMAGE MUST BE USED IN CONTEXT OF STORY***
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Emmanuelle Charpentier, Director, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, and Honorary Professor at Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany, seen here in an image released to the media by her department. Emmanuelle is one of the winners of the The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2020 for her work on the discovery of for the development of a method for genome editing. (Photo by Hallbauer&Fioretti/Emmanuelle Charpentier via Sipa USA) ***EDITORIAL USE ONLY**MANDATORY CREDIT**IMAGE MUST BE USED IN CONTEXT OF STORY***
***EDITORIAL USE ONLY**MANDATORY CREDIT**IMAGE MUST BE USED IN CONTEXT OF STORY***
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Emmanuelle Charpentier, Director, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, and Honorary Professor at Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany, seen here in an image released to the media by her department. Emmanuelle is one of the winners of the The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2020 for her work on the discovery of for the development of a method for genome editing. (Photo by Hallbauer&Fioretti/Emmanuelle Charpentier via Sipa USA) ***EDITORIAL USE ONLY**MANDATORY CREDIT**IMAGE MUST BE USED IN CONTEXT OF STORY***
***EDITORIAL USE ONLY**MANDATORY CREDIT**IMAGE MUST BE USED IN CONTEXT OF STORY***
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A screen shows French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and US professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology, Jennifer Doudna during the announcement of the 2020 Nobel laureates in Chemistry during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, on October 7, 2020. (Photo by Henrik MONTGOMERY / various sources / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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Professor Pernilla Wittung Stafshede (L) and Goran K. Hansson, Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences announce the winners of the 2020 Nobel prize in Chemistry shown on the screen French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and US professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology, Jennifer Doudna at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, on October 7, 2020. (Photo by Henrik MONTGOMERY / various sources / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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Professor Pernilla Wittung Stafshede (L) and Goran K. Hansson, Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences announce the winners of the 2020 Nobel prize in Chemistry shown on the screen French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and US professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology, Jennifer Doudna at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, on October 7, 2020. (Photo by Henrik MONTGOMERY / TT News Agency / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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Professor Pernilla Wittung Stafshede (L) and Goran K. Hansson, Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences announce the winners of the 2020 Nobel prize in Chemistry shown on the screen French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and US professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology, Jennifer Doudna at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, on October 7, 2020. (Photo by Henrik MONTGOMERY / various sources / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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Claes Gustafsson Secretary General of the Nobel committee in Chemistry, speaks during the announcement the winners of the 2020 Nobel prize in Chemistry during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Henrik MONTGOMERY / various sources / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier poses with a Swedish doll for photographers in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Odd ANDERSEN / AFP)
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French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier poses with a Swedish doll for photographers in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Odd ANDERSEN / AFP)
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French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier poses for photographers in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Odd ANDERSEN / AFP)
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French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier poses for photographers in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Odd ANDERSEN / AFP)
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French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier poses for photographers in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Odd ANDERSEN / AFP)
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French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier poses for photographers next to a bust of Max Planck in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Odd ANDERSEN / AFP)
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French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier poses for photographers next to a bust of Max Planck in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Odd ANDERSEN / AFP)
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French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier poses for photographers next to a bust of Max Planck in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Odd ANDERSEN / AFP)
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French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier poses for photographers next to a bust of Max Planck in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Odd ANDERSEN / AFP)
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French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier poses for photographers in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Odd ANDERSEN / AFP)
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French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier poses for photographers in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Odd ANDERSEN / AFP)
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French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier poses for photographers in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Odd ANDERSEN / AFP)
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French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier poses ahead a press conference in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Tobias SCHWARZ / AFP)
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French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier attends a press conference in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Tobias SCHWARZ / AFP)
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EN_01448859_1149
French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier attends a press conference in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Tobias SCHWARZ / AFP)
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EN_01448859_1151
French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier attends a press conference in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Tobias SCHWARZ / AFP)
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EN_01448859_1152
French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier attends a press conference in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Tobias SCHWARZ / AFP)
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EN_01448859_1153
French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier attends a press conference in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Tobias SCHWARZ / AFP)
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EN_01448859_1154
French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier attends a press conference in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Tobias SCHWARZ / AFP)
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EN_01448859_1198
French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier attends a press conference in Berlin, on October 7, 2020. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Tobias SCHWARZ / AFP)
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EN_01449302_0007
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier holds her mascot, a little doll with a Swedish flag, and makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry together with J.A. Doudna. They have been instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 gene scissors. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0008
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier leans against a bust of Max Planck and makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in developing the Crispr/Cas9 genetic scissors. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0009
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier leans against a bust of Max Planck and makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in developing the Crispr/Cas9 genetic scissors. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0010
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0011
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0014
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier is holding her mascot, a little doll with a Swedish flag, after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J.A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 gene scissors. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0017
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0018
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0025
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0026
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0027
dpatop - 07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier leans against a bust of Max Planck and makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in developing the Crispr/Cas9 genetic scissors. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0028
dpatop - 07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier leans against a bust of Max Planck and makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in developing the Crispr/Cas9 genetic scissors. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0029
dpatop - 07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier is holding her mascot, a little doll with a Swedish flag, after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J.A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 gene scissors. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0030
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier leans against a bust of Max Planck and makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in developing the Crispr/Cas9 genetic scissors. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0031
07 October 2020, Sweden, Stockholm: Johan ?qvist from the Nobel Committee on Chemistry of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. (to dpa "How sick cells are helped by scissors") Photo: Steffen Trumpf/dpa
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EN_01449302_0032
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0033
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0034
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier comes to a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0035
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0036
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier comes to a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0040
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier comes to a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0042
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0043
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier is holding her mascot, a little doll with a Swedish flag, after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J.A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 gene scissors. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0044
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0045
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0046
07 October 2020, Berlin: The French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier leans against a bust of Max Planck and makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in developing the Crispr/Cas9 genetic scissors. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0047
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier leans against a bust of Max Planck and makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in developing the Crispr/Cas9 genetic scissors. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0048
07 October 2020, Berlin: The French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier leans against a bust of Max Planck and makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in developing the Crispr/Cas9 genetic scissors. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0049
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier leans against a bust of Max Planck and makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in developing the Crispr/Cas9 genetic scissors. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0050
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier leans against a bust of Max Planck and makes a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in developing the Crispr/Cas9 genetic scissors. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01449302_0057
07 October 2020, Berlin: French genetic researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier comes to a statement after winning this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry together with J. A. Doudna. They were instrumental in the development of the Crispr/Cas9 genetic shears. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
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EN_01448858_0828
FILE -- In this Nov. 7, 2018 file photo French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier poses for a photo in Berlin, Germany. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to ???molecular scissors??? that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (Christoph Soeder/dpa via AP)
NOV. 7, 2018 FILE PHOTO
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FILED - 07 November 2018, Berlin: Emmanuelle Charpentier, French microbiologist and director at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin, is standing at the presentation of the Berlin Science Prize 2018 in the Rotes Rathaus. The scientist and her US colleague Doudna were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: Christoph Soeder/dpa
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FILED - 07 November 2018, Berlin: Emmanuelle Charpentier, French microbiologist and director at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin, is standing at the presentation of the Berlin Science Prize 2018 in the Rotes Rathaus. The scientist and her US colleague Doudna were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: Christoph Soeder/dpa
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EN_01449302_0058
FILED - 07 November 2018, Berlin: Emmanuelle Charpentier, French microbiologist and director at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin, is standing at the presentation of the Berlin Science Prize 2018 in the Rotes Rathaus. The scientist and her US colleague Doudna were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: Christoph Soeder/dpa
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EN_01448859_0554
(FILES) In this file photo taken on May 02, 2016 Jennifer Doudna, Professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, addresses the audience during the lunch program "The Future of Humankind" at the 2016 Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California. - Emmanuelle Charpentier (France) and Jennifer Doudna (US) were announced on October 07, 2020 as laureates of the 2020 Nobel Chemistry Prize. (Photo by FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP)
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FILE -- In this March 14, 2016 file photo American biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna, left, and the French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier, right, poses for a photo in Frankfurt, Germany. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to ???molecular scissors??? that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (Alexander Heinl/dpa via AP)
MARCH 14, 2016 FILE PHOTO
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FILE -- In this March 14, 2016 file photo French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier poses for a photo in Frankfurt, Germany. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to ???molecular scissors??? that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (Alexander Heinl/dpa via AP)
MARCH 14, 2016 FILE PHOTO
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FILE -- In this March 14, 2016 file photo American biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna poses for a photo in Frankfurt, Germany. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to ???molecular scissors??? that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (Alexander Heinl/dpa via AP)
MARCH 14, 2016 FILE PHOTO
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FILE -- In this March 14, 2016 file photo American biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna poses for a photo in Frankfurt, Germany. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to ???molecular scissors??? that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (Alexander Heinl/dpa via AP)
MARCH 14, 2016 FILE PHOTO
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FILE -- In this March 14, 2016 file photo American biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna poses for a photo in Frankfurt, Germany. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to ???molecular scissors??? that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (Alexander Heinl/dpa via AP)
MARCH 14, 2016 FILE PHOTO
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FILE -- In this March 14, 2016 file photo French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier poses for a photo in Frankfurt, Germany. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to ???molecular scissors??? that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (Alexander Heinl/dpa via AP)
MARCH 14, 2016 FILE PHOTO
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FILED - 14 March 2016, Hessen, Frankfurt/Main: The American biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna (l) and the French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier, then winners of the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize 2016, are together in the casino of Goethe University. The two scientists were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: picture alliance / dpa
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FILED - 14 March 2016, Hessen, Frankfurt/Main: The French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier, winner of the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize 2016, is standing in the casino of the Goethe University. The scientist and her US colleague Doudna were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: picture alliance / dpa
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FILED - 14 March 2016, Hessen, Frankfurt/Main: The American biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna, winner of the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize 2016, is standing in the casino of Goethe University. The scientist and her French colleague Charpentier were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: picture alliance / dpa
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EN_01449302_0019
FILED - 14 March 2016, Hessen, Frankfurt/Main: The French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier, winner of the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize 2016, is standing in the casino of the Goethe University. The scientist and her US colleague Doudna were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: picture alliance / dpa
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EN_01449302_0024
FILED - 14 March 2016, Hessen, Frankfurt/Main: The French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier, winner of the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize 2016, is standing in the casino of the Goethe University. The scientist and her US colleague Doudna were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: picture alliance / dpa
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EN_01449302_0052
FILED - 14 March 2016, Hessen, Frankfurt/Main: The American biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna, winner of the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize 2016, is standing in the casino of Goethe University. The scientist and her French colleague Charpentier were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: picture alliance / dpa
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EN_01449302_0055
FILED - 14 March 2016, Hessen, Frankfurt/Main: The American biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna, winner of the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize 2016, is standing in the casino of Goethe University. The scientist and her French colleague Charpentier were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: picture alliance / dpa
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EN_01449302_0059
FILED - 14 March 2016, Hessen, Frankfurt/Main: The French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier, winner of the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize 2016, is standing in the casino of the Goethe University. The scientist and her US colleague Doudna were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: picture alliance / dpa
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EN_01449302_0001
FILED - 01 March 2016, Berlin: The French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier at the award of the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize. The scientist and her US colleague Doudna were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: picture alliance / dpa
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EN_01449302_0002
FILED - 01 March 2016, Berlin: The French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier at the award of the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize. The scientist and her US colleague Doudna were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: picture alliance / dpa
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EN_01449302_0003
FILED - 01 March 2016, Berlin: The French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier at the award of the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize. The scientist and her US colleague Doudna were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: picture alliance / dpa
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EN_01449302_0004
FILED - 01 March 2016, Berlin: The French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier at the award of the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize. The scientist and her US colleague Doudna were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: picture alliance / dpa
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EN_01449302_0006
FILED - 01 March 2016, Berlin: The French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier at the award of the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize. The scientist and her US colleague Doudna were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: picture alliance / dpa
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EN_01448859_0548
(FILES) This file photo taken on October 23, 2015 shows French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and US professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology, Jennifer Doudna on the stage after receiving the 2015 Princess of Asturias Award for Technical and Scientific Reseach from Spain's King Felipe during the Princess of Asturias awards ceremony at the Campoamor Theatre in Oviedo. - Emmanuelle Charpentier (France) and Jennifer Doudna (US) win the 2020 Nobel Chemistry Prize. (Photo by Miguel RIOPA / AFP)
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EN_01448859_0551
(FILES) This file photo taken on October 23, 2015 shows French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and US professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology, Jennifer Doudna on the stage after receiving the 2015 Princess of Asturias Award for Technical and Scientific Reseach from Spain's King Felipe during the Princess of Asturias awards ceremony at the Campoamor Theatre in Oviedo. - Emmanuelle Charpentier (France) and Jennifer Doudna (US) win the 2020 Nobel Chemistry Prize. (Photo by Miguel RIOPA / AFP)
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(FILES) In this file photo taken on October 23, 2015 French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier celebrates on the stage after receiving the 2015 Princess of Asturias Award for Technical and Scientific Reseach from Spain's King during the Princess of Asturias awards ceremony at the Campoamor Theatre in Oviedo. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Miguel RIOPA / AFP)
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EN_01448859_0555
(FILES) This file photo taken on October 21, 2015 shows French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and US professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology, Jennifer Doudna posing beside a painting made by children of the genoma at the San Francisco park in Oviedo. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on Tuesday, October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Miguel RIOPA / AFP)
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EN_01448859_0556
(FILES) This file photo taken on October 21, 2015 shows French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and US professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology, Jennifer Doudna posing beside a painting made by children of the genoma at the San Francisco park in Oviedo. - Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US on Tuesday, October 7, 2020 won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for research into the gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool. (Photo by Miguel RIOPA / AFP)

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