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Новорожденный детёныш гориллы (6)

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This critically endangered western lowland gorilla was born in the morning hours of September 4, 2020 - the first gorilla birth at Audubon Zoo in New Orleans in 24 years and the first offspring for 13-year-old Tumani. Mother and baby are doing well, the zoo said. Animal care staff are closely monitoring the infant?s health to ensure that mother and baby are receiving the care needed. ?This is a momentous occasion for Audubon Zoo,? said Audubon Nature Institute President and CEO Ron Forman. ?We are thrilled to share this birth with our New Orleans community and contribute to the conservation efforts of this critically endangered species.? The birth is the result of successful breeding between 13-year-old Tumani and Okpara, a 27-year-old silverback gorilla. The last gorilla born there was Praline in 1996, who is still part of the troop, officials said. The sex of the newborn is not yet known. The primate enclosure will remain closed to the public until the infant bonds with the rest of the gorilla troop, officials said. But all gorillas will have access to their outdoor habitat, so guests may catch a glimpse of the new addition during their Zoo visit once World of Primates has reopened. Guests can spot the infant by a small white patch of hair on its rump. The patch will fade away when the gorilla reaches three to four years of age. This white patch helps mother gorillas keep track of infants and assists other group members in identifying the gorilla as an infant. Audubon Zoo reopened on June 3, 2020, following a nearly three-month closure. Western lowland gorillas, native to Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and parts of other nearby countries are on the critically endangered list. They are slightly smaller than other gorillas, about 4 to 5.5 feet tall when standing upright and weighing up to 440 pounds, according to the World Wildlife Fund. Audubon Zoo has created an online baby registry as a way for the public to get involved in the birth of the infant. Supporters can help shower Tumani and baby with nutritious food, engaging enrichment, and training materials carefully selected by Audubon Zoo?s animal care and veterinary team. Please credit Courtesy of Audubon Zoo / MEGA. 09 Sep 2020 Pictured: Mother Tumani and newborn infant gorilla. Photo credit: Courtesy of Audubon Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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This critically endangered western lowland gorilla was born in the morning hours of September 4, 2020 - the first gorilla birth at Audubon Zoo in New Orleans in 24 years and the first offspring for 13-year-old Tumani. Mother and baby are doing well, the zoo said. Animal care staff are closely monitoring the infant?s health to ensure that mother and baby are receiving the care needed. ?This is a momentous occasion for Audubon Zoo,? said Audubon Nature Institute President and CEO Ron Forman. ?We are thrilled to share this birth with our New Orleans community and contribute to the conservation efforts of this critically endangered species.? The birth is the result of successful breeding between 13-year-old Tumani and Okpara, a 27-year-old silverback gorilla. The last gorilla born there was Praline in 1996, who is still part of the troop, officials said. The sex of the newborn is not yet known. The primate enclosure will remain closed to the public until the infant bonds with the rest of the gorilla troop, officials said. But all gorillas will have access to their outdoor habitat, so guests may catch a glimpse of the new addition during their Zoo visit once World of Primates has reopened. Guests can spot the infant by a small white patch of hair on its rump. The patch will fade away when the gorilla reaches three to four years of age. This white patch helps mother gorillas keep track of infants and assists other group members in identifying the gorilla as an infant. Audubon Zoo reopened on June 3, 2020, following a nearly three-month closure. Western lowland gorillas, native to Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and parts of other nearby countries are on the critically endangered list. They are slightly smaller than other gorillas, about 4 to 5.5 feet tall when standing upright and weighing up to 440 pounds, according to the World Wildlife Fund. Audubon Zoo has created an online baby registry as a way for the public to get involved in the birth of the infant. Supporters can help shower Tumani and baby with nutritious food, engaging enrichment, and training materials carefully selected by Audubon Zoo?s animal care and veterinary team. Please credit Courtesy of Audubon Zoo / MEGA. 09 Sep 2020 Pictured: Mother Tumani and newborn infant gorilla. Photo credit: Courtesy of Audubon Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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This critically endangered western lowland gorilla was born in the morning hours of September 4, 2020 - the first gorilla birth at Audubon Zoo in New Orleans in 24 years and the first offspring for 13-year-old Tumani. Mother and baby are doing well, the zoo said. Animal care staff are closely monitoring the infant?s health to ensure that mother and baby are receiving the care needed. ?This is a momentous occasion for Audubon Zoo,? said Audubon Nature Institute President and CEO Ron Forman. ?We are thrilled to share this birth with our New Orleans community and contribute to the conservation efforts of this critically endangered species.? The birth is the result of successful breeding between 13-year-old Tumani and Okpara, a 27-year-old silverback gorilla. The last gorilla born there was Praline in 1996, who is still part of the troop, officials said. The sex of the newborn is not yet known. The primate enclosure will remain closed to the public until the infant bonds with the rest of the gorilla troop, officials said. But all gorillas will have access to their outdoor habitat, so guests may catch a glimpse of the new addition during their Zoo visit once World of Primates has reopened. Guests can spot the infant by a small white patch of hair on its rump. The patch will fade away when the gorilla reaches three to four years of age. This white patch helps mother gorillas keep track of infants and assists other group members in identifying the gorilla as an infant. Audubon Zoo reopened on June 3, 2020, following a nearly three-month closure. Western lowland gorillas, native to Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and parts of other nearby countries are on the critically endangered list. They are slightly smaller than other gorillas, about 4 to 5.5 feet tall when standing upright and weighing up to 440 pounds, according to the World Wildlife Fund. Audubon Zoo has created an online baby registry as a way for the public to get involved in the birth of the infant. Supporters can help shower Tumani and baby with nutritious food, engaging enrichment, and training materials carefully selected by Audubon Zoo?s animal care and veterinary team. Please credit Courtesy of Audubon Zoo / MEGA. 09 Sep 2020 Pictured: Mother Tumani and newborn infant gorilla. Photo credit: Courtesy of Audubon Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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This critically endangered western lowland gorilla was born in the morning hours of September 4, 2020 - the first gorilla birth at Audubon Zoo in New Orleans in 24 years and the first offspring for 13-year-old Tumani. Mother and baby are doing well, the zoo said. Animal care staff are closely monitoring the infant?s health to ensure that mother and baby are receiving the care needed. ?This is a momentous occasion for Audubon Zoo,? said Audubon Nature Institute President and CEO Ron Forman. ?We are thrilled to share this birth with our New Orleans community and contribute to the conservation efforts of this critically endangered species.? The birth is the result of successful breeding between 13-year-old Tumani and Okpara, a 27-year-old silverback gorilla. The last gorilla born there was Praline in 1996, who is still part of the troop, officials said. The sex of the newborn is not yet known. The primate enclosure will remain closed to the public until the infant bonds with the rest of the gorilla troop, officials said. But all gorillas will have access to their outdoor habitat, so guests may catch a glimpse of the new addition during their Zoo visit once World of Primates has reopened. Guests can spot the infant by a small white patch of hair on its rump. The patch will fade away when the gorilla reaches three to four years of age. This white patch helps mother gorillas keep track of infants and assists other group members in identifying the gorilla as an infant. Audubon Zoo reopened on June 3, 2020, following a nearly three-month closure. Western lowland gorillas, native to Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and parts of other nearby countries are on the critically endangered list. They are slightly smaller than other gorillas, about 4 to 5.5 feet tall when standing upright and weighing up to 440 pounds, according to the World Wildlife Fund. Audubon Zoo has created an online baby registry as a way for the public to get involved in the birth of the infant. Supporters can help shower Tumani and baby with nutritious food, engaging enrichment, and training materials carefully selected by Audubon Zoo?s animal care and veterinary team. Please credit Courtesy of Audubon Zoo / MEGA. 09 Sep 2020 Pictured: Mother Tumani and newborn infant gorilla. Photo credit: Courtesy of Audubon Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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This critically endangered western lowland gorilla was born in the morning hours of September 4, 2020 - the first gorilla birth at Audubon Zoo in New Orleans in 24 years and the first offspring for 13-year-old Tumani. Mother and baby are doing well, the zoo said. Animal care staff are closely monitoring the infant?s health to ensure that mother and baby are receiving the care needed. ?This is a momentous occasion for Audubon Zoo,? said Audubon Nature Institute President and CEO Ron Forman. ?We are thrilled to share this birth with our New Orleans community and contribute to the conservation efforts of this critically endangered species.? The birth is the result of successful breeding between 13-year-old Tumani and Okpara, a 27-year-old silverback gorilla. The last gorilla born there was Praline in 1996, who is still part of the troop, officials said. The sex of the newborn is not yet known. The primate enclosure will remain closed to the public until the infant bonds with the rest of the gorilla troop, officials said. But all gorillas will have access to their outdoor habitat, so guests may catch a glimpse of the new addition during their Zoo visit once World of Primates has reopened. Guests can spot the infant by a small white patch of hair on its rump. The patch will fade away when the gorilla reaches three to four years of age. This white patch helps mother gorillas keep track of infants and assists other group members in identifying the gorilla as an infant. Audubon Zoo reopened on June 3, 2020, following a nearly three-month closure. Western lowland gorillas, native to Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and parts of other nearby countries are on the critically endangered list. They are slightly smaller than other gorillas, about 4 to 5.5 feet tall when standing upright and weighing up to 440 pounds, according to the World Wildlife Fund. Audubon Zoo has created an online baby registry as a way for the public to get involved in the birth of the infant. Supporters can help shower Tumani and baby with nutritious food, engaging enrichment, and training materials carefully selected by Audubon Zoo?s animal care and veterinary team. Please credit Courtesy of Audubon Zoo / MEGA. 09 Sep 2020 Pictured: Mother Tumani and newborn infant gorilla. Photo credit: Courtesy of Audubon Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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This critically endangered western lowland gorilla was born in the morning hours of September 4, 2020 - the first gorilla birth at Audubon Zoo in New Orleans in 24 years and the first offspring for 13-year-old Tumani. Mother and baby are doing well, the zoo said. Animal care staff are closely monitoring the infant?s health to ensure that mother and baby are receiving the care needed. ?This is a momentous occasion for Audubon Zoo,? said Audubon Nature Institute President and CEO Ron Forman. ?We are thrilled to share this birth with our New Orleans community and contribute to the conservation efforts of this critically endangered species.? The birth is the result of successful breeding between 13-year-old Tumani and Okpara, a 27-year-old silverback gorilla. The last gorilla born there was Praline in 1996, who is still part of the troop, officials said. The sex of the newborn is not yet known. The primate enclosure will remain closed to the public until the infant bonds with the rest of the gorilla troop, officials said. But all gorillas will have access to their outdoor habitat, so guests may catch a glimpse of the new addition during their Zoo visit once World of Primates has reopened. Guests can spot the infant by a small white patch of hair on its rump. The patch will fade away when the gorilla reaches three to four years of age. This white patch helps mother gorillas keep track of infants and assists other group members in identifying the gorilla as an infant. Audubon Zoo reopened on June 3, 2020, following a nearly three-month closure. Western lowland gorillas, native to Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and parts of other nearby countries are on the critically endangered list. They are slightly smaller than other gorillas, about 4 to 5.5 feet tall when standing upright and weighing up to 440 pounds, according to the World Wildlife Fund. Audubon Zoo has created an online baby registry as a way for the public to get involved in the birth of the infant. Supporters can help shower Tumani and baby with nutritious food, engaging enrichment, and training materials carefully selected by Audubon Zoo?s animal care and veterinary team. Please credit Courtesy of Audubon Zoo / MEGA. 09 Sep 2020 Pictured: Mother Tumani and newborn infant gorilla. Photo credit: Courtesy of Audubon Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights