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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
EN_01388633_0017
EN_01388633_0017
General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
EN_01388633_0018
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
EN_01388633_0019
EN_01388633_0019
General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
EN_01388633_0021
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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EN_01388633_0022
General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
EN_01388633_0026
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General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
EN_01388633_0027
EN_01388633_0027
General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
EN_01388633_0028
EN_01388633_0028
General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
EN_01388633_0029
EN_01388633_0029
General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
EN_01388633_0030
EN_01388633_0030
General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
EN_01388633_0031
EN_01388633_0031
General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
EN_01388633_0032
EN_01388633_0032
General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a
EN_01388633_0033
EN_01388633_0033
General view of Gobekli Tepe archaeological site in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on July 27, 2019. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest, biggest, and most mysterious archaeological site on the planet. Gobekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic structure ever found on earth. Discovered in modern-day Turkey, and still yet to be fully excavated, it dates to a baffling 12,000 years old. It's not just the oldest site; it's also the largest. Situated on a flat, barren plateau, the site is a spectacular 90,000 square meters. That's bigger than 12 football fields. It's 50 times larger than Stonehenge, and in the same breath, 6000 years older. The mysterious people who built G?bekli Tepe not only went to extraordinary lengths they did it with laser-like skill. Then, they purposely buried it and left. The site is located close to the Syrian border, in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, about 12 km (7 mi) northeast of the city of ??anlAaurfa. G?bekli Tepe means in English, Pot-Belly Hill. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (980 ft) in diameter. It is approximately 760 m (2,490 ft) above sea level. The tell includes two phases of use, believed to be of a social or ritual nature by site discoverer and excavator Klaus Schmidt, dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE.[4] During the first phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected - the world's oldest known megaliths. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and weighs up to 10 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock. In the second phase, belonging to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). Younger structures date to classical times. The details of the structure's function remain a