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Ferrari Press Agency Ref 9070 Friendly robot 1 08/04/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit : Yonsei University and KAIST University A robot that listens to you at home and shares your every move with your friends has been developed to help young people tackle loneliness.Scientists behind the robot, named Fribo, claim it encourages its owner to text and call their friends to help them socialise.To do this, the robot senses when you open a door or turn on a light and then messages your group to let them know what you're up to.Researchers think Fribo could be particularly helpful to old people living alone to help them engage.In early trials, users said Fribo helped them to contact friends more but some expressed privacy concerns.According to scientists behind the project, from South Korean institutes Yonsei University and KAIST University, Fribo brings together people who are physically isolated.It is designed to be left at home and houses microphones and sensors that listen in for domestic activities.The robot registers when someone comes home, opens a fridge, turns on a light, vacuums and more.It then shares these updates with the Fribos of your closest friends, triggering each of the robots to announce that a member of the group has been active.For example, if a user opens their front door, each friend with a Fribos will hear it announce: ??sOho! Your friend opened the front door. Did someone just come home????The friends can then respond either by texting the group chat or by knocking twice near their Fribo, which triggers a direct message asking them what they are doing.Users can also clap three times to send an encouraging message in response to a friend's activity .Fribo was introduced at the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction in Chicago last month.Scientists say it operates by listening for anything in the home that makes noise .The robot doesn't record voices, meaning it is more private than gadgets like the Amazon Alexa or Google H
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EN_01313867_0002
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 9070 Friendly robot 1 08/04/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit : Yonsei University and KAIST University A robot that listens to you at home and shares your every move with your friends has been developed to help young people tackle loneliness.Scientists behind the robot, named Fribo, claim it encourages its owner to text and call their friends to help them socialise.To do this, the robot senses when you open a door or turn on a light and then messages your group to let them know what you're up to.Researchers think Fribo could be particularly helpful to old people living alone to help them engage.In early trials, users said Fribo helped them to contact friends more but some expressed privacy concerns.According to scientists behind the project, from South Korean institutes Yonsei University and KAIST University, Fribo brings together people who are physically isolated.It is designed to be left at home and houses microphones and sensors that listen in for domestic activities.The robot registers when someone comes home, opens a fridge, turns on a light, vacuums and more.It then shares these updates with the Fribos of your closest friends, triggering each of the robots to announce that a member of the group has been active.For example, if a user opens their front door, each friend with a Fribos will hear it announce: ??sOho! Your friend opened the front door. Did someone just come home????The friends can then respond either by texting the group chat or by knocking twice near their Fribo, which triggers a direct message asking them what they are doing.Users can also clap three times to send an encouraging message in response to a friend's activity .Fribo was introduced at the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction in Chicago last month.Scientists say it operates by listening for anything in the home that makes noise .The robot doesn't record voices, meaning it is more private than gadgets like the Amazon Alexa or Google H
EN_01313867_0003
EN_01313867_0003
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 9070 Friendly robot 1 08/04/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit : Yonsei University and KAIST University A robot that listens to you at home and shares your every move with your friends has been developed to help young people tackle loneliness.Scientists behind the robot, named Fribo, claim it encourages its owner to text and call their friends to help them socialise.To do this, the robot senses when you open a door or turn on a light and then messages your group to let them know what you're up to.Researchers think Fribo could be particularly helpful to old people living alone to help them engage.In early trials, users said Fribo helped them to contact friends more but some expressed privacy concerns.According to scientists behind the project, from South Korean institutes Yonsei University and KAIST University, Fribo brings together people who are physically isolated.It is designed to be left at home and houses microphones and sensors that listen in for domestic activities.The robot registers when someone comes home, opens a fridge, turns on a light, vacuums and more.It then shares these updates with the Fribos of your closest friends, triggering each of the robots to announce that a member of the group has been active.For example, if a user opens their front door, each friend with a Fribos will hear it announce: ??sOho! Your friend opened the front door. Did someone just come home????The friends can then respond either by texting the group chat or by knocking twice near their Fribo, which triggers a direct message asking them what they are doing.Users can also clap three times to send an encouraging message in response to a friend's activity .Fribo was introduced at the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction in Chicago last month.Scientists say it operates by listening for anything in the home that makes noise .The robot doesn't record voices, meaning it is more private than gadgets like the Amazon Alexa or Google H
EN_01313867_0004
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Ferrari Press Agency Ref 9070 Friendly robot 1 08/04/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit : Yonsei University and KAIST University A robot that listens to you at home and shares your every move with your friends has been developed to help young people tackle loneliness.Scientists behind the robot, named Fribo, claim it encourages its owner to text and call their friends to help them socialise.To do this, the robot senses when you open a door or turn on a light and then messages your group to let them know what you're up to.Researchers think Fribo could be particularly helpful to old people living alone to help them engage.In early trials, users said Fribo helped them to contact friends more but some expressed privacy concerns.According to scientists behind the project, from South Korean institutes Yonsei University and KAIST University, Fribo brings together people who are physically isolated.It is designed to be left at home and houses microphones and sensors that listen in for domestic activities.The robot registers when someone comes home, opens a fridge, turns on a light, vacuums and more.It then shares these updates with the Fribos of your closest friends, triggering each of the robots to announce that a member of the group has been active.For example, if a user opens their front door, each friend with a Fribos will hear it announce: ??sOho! Your friend opened the front door. Did someone just come home????The friends can then respond either by texting the group chat or by knocking twice near their Fribo, which triggers a direct message asking them what they are doing.Users can also clap three times to send an encouraging message in response to a friend's activity .Fribo was introduced at the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction in Chicago last month.Scientists say it operates by listening for anything in the home that makes noise .The robot doesn't record voices, meaning it is more private than gadgets like the Amazon Alexa or Google H
EN_01313867_0005
EN_01313867_0005
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 9070 Friendly robot 1 08/04/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit : Yonsei University and KAIST University A robot that listens to you at home and shares your every move with your friends has been developed to help young people tackle loneliness.Scientists behind the robot, named Fribo, claim it encourages its owner to text and call their friends to help them socialise.To do this, the robot senses when you open a door or turn on a light and then messages your group to let them know what you're up to.Researchers think Fribo could be particularly helpful to old people living alone to help them engage.In early trials, users said Fribo helped them to contact friends more but some expressed privacy concerns.According to scientists behind the project, from South Korean institutes Yonsei University and KAIST University, Fribo brings together people who are physically isolated.It is designed to be left at home and houses microphones and sensors that listen in for domestic activities.The robot registers when someone comes home, opens a fridge, turns on a light, vacuums and more.It then shares these updates with the Fribos of your closest friends, triggering each of the robots to announce that a member of the group has been active.For example, if a user opens their front door, each friend with a Fribos will hear it announce: ??sOho! Your friend opened the front door. Did someone just come home????The friends can then respond either by texting the group chat or by knocking twice near their Fribo, which triggers a direct message asking them what they are doing.Users can also clap three times to send an encouraging message in response to a friend's activity .Fribo was introduced at the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction in Chicago last month.Scientists say it operates by listening for anything in the home that makes noise .The robot doesn't record voices, meaning it is more private than gadgets like the Amazon Alexa or Google H
EN_01313867_0006
EN_01313867_0006
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 9070 Friendly robot 1 08/04/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit : Yonsei University and KAIST University A robot that listens to you at home and shares your every move with your friends has been developed to help young people tackle loneliness.Scientists behind the robot, named Fribo, claim it encourages its owner to text and call their friends to help them socialise.To do this, the robot senses when you open a door or turn on a light and then messages your group to let them know what you're up to.Researchers think Fribo could be particularly helpful to old people living alone to help them engage.In early trials, users said Fribo helped them to contact friends more but some expressed privacy concerns.According to scientists behind the project, from South Korean institutes Yonsei University and KAIST University, Fribo brings together people who are physically isolated.It is designed to be left at home and houses microphones and sensors that listen in for domestic activities.The robot registers when someone comes home, opens a fridge, turns on a light, vacuums and more.It then shares these updates with the Fribos of your closest friends, triggering each of the robots to announce that a member of the group has been active.For example, if a user opens their front door, each friend with a Fribos will hear it announce: ??sOho! Your friend opened the front door. Did someone just come home????The friends can then respond either by texting the group chat or by knocking twice near their Fribo, which triggers a direct message asking them what they are doing.Users can also clap three times to send an encouraging message in response to a friend's activity .Fribo was introduced at the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction in Chicago last month.Scientists say it operates by listening for anything in the home that makes noise .The robot doesn't record voices, meaning it is more private than gadgets like the Amazon Alexa or Google H
EN_01313867_0007
EN_01313867_0007
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 9070 Friendly robot 1 08/04/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit : Yonsei University and KAIST University A robot that listens to you at home and shares your every move with your friends has been developed to help young people tackle loneliness.Scientists behind the robot, named Fribo, claim it encourages its owner to text and call their friends to help them socialise.To do this, the robot senses when you open a door or turn on a light and then messages your group to let them know what you're up to.Researchers think Fribo could be particularly helpful to old people living alone to help them engage.In early trials, users said Fribo helped them to contact friends more but some expressed privacy concerns.According to scientists behind the project, from South Korean institutes Yonsei University and KAIST University, Fribo brings together people who are physically isolated.It is designed to be left at home and houses microphones and sensors that listen in for domestic activities.The robot registers when someone comes home, opens a fridge, turns on a light, vacuums and more.It then shares these updates with the Fribos of your closest friends, triggering each of the robots to announce that a member of the group has been active.For example, if a user opens their front door, each friend with a Fribos will hear it announce: ??sOho! Your friend opened the front door. Did someone just come home????The friends can then respond either by texting the group chat or by knocking twice near their Fribo, which triggers a direct message asking them what they are doing.Users can also clap three times to send an encouraging message in response to a friend's activity .Fribo was introduced at the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction in Chicago last month.Scientists say it operates by listening for anything in the home that makes noise .The robot doesn't record voices, meaning it is more private than gadgets like the Amazon Alexa or Google H