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(180207) -- FLORIDA, Feb. 7, 2018 (Xinhua) -- A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from Florida's Kennedy Space Center, the United States, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy blasted off from the Kennedy Space Center in the U.S. State of Florida at 3:45 p.m. EST (2145 GMT), carrying something just for fun: a red Tesla Roadster belonging to SpaceX and Tesla founder Elon Musk. (Xinhua/NASA) (jmmn) - NASA -//CHINENOUVELLE_chinenouvelle6241091
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(180207) -- FLORIDA, Feb. 7, 2018 (Xinhua) -- A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from Florida's Kennedy Space Center, the United States, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy blasted off from the Kennedy Space Center in the U.S. State of Florida at 3:45 p.m. EST (2145 GMT), carrying something just for fun: a red Tesla Roadster belonging to SpaceX and Tesla founder Elon Musk. (Xinhua/NASA) (jmmn) - NASA -//CHINENOUVELLE_chinenouvelle6241092
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(180207) -- FLORIDA, Feb. 7, 2018 (Xinhua) -- A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from Florida's Kennedy Space Center, the United States, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy blasted off from the Kennedy Space Center in the U.S. State of Florida at 3:45 p.m. EST (2145 GMT), carrying something just for fun: a red Tesla Roadster belonging to SpaceX and Tesla founder Elon Musk. (Xinhua/NASA) (jmmn) - NASA -//CHINENOUVELLE_chinenouvelle6241093
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(180207) -- FLORIDA, Feb. 7, 2018 (Xinhua) -- A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from Florida's Kennedy Space Center, the United States, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy blasted off from the Kennedy Space Center in the U.S. State of Florida at 3:45 p.m. EST (2145 GMT), carrying something just for fun: a red Tesla Roadster belonging to SpaceX and Tesla founder Elon Musk. (Xinhua/NASA) (jmmn) - NASA -//CHINENOUVELLE_chinenouvelle6241091
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(180207) -- FLORIDA, Feb. 7, 2018 (Xinhua) -- A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from Florida's Kennedy Space Center, the United States, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy blasted off from the Kennedy Space Center in the U.S. State of Florida at 3:45 p.m. EST (2145 GMT), carrying something just for fun: a red Tesla Roadster belonging to SpaceX and Tesla founder Elon Musk. (Xinhua/NASA) (jmmn) - NASA -//CHINENOUVELLE_chinenouvelle6241092
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(180207) -- FLORIDA, Feb. 7, 2018 (Xinhua) -- A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from Florida's Kennedy Space Center, the United States, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy blasted off from the Kennedy Space Center in the U.S. State of Florida at 3:45 p.m. EST (2145 GMT), carrying something just for fun: a red Tesla Roadster belonging to SpaceX and Tesla founder Elon Musk. (Xinhua/NASA) (jmmn) - NASA -//CHINENOUVELLE_chinenouvelle6241093
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The crowd cheers at Playalinda Beach in the Canaveral National Seashore, just north of the Kennedy Space Center, during the succesful launch of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Playalinda is one of closest public viewing spots to see the launch, about 3 miles from the SpaceX launchpad 39A. Photo by Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS/ABACAPRESS.COM
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The crowd cheers at Playalinda Beach in the Canaveral National Seashore, just north of the Kennedy Space Center, during the succesful launch of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Playalinda is one of closest public viewing spots to see the launch, about 3 miles from the SpaceX launchpad 39A. Photo by Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS/ABACAPRESS.COM
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The crowd cheers at Playalinda Beach in the Canaveral National Seashore, just north of the Kennedy Space Center, during the succesful launch of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Playalinda is one of closest public viewing spots to see the launch, about 3 miles from the SpaceX launchpad 39A. Photo by Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS/ABACAPRESS.COM
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A SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from launch Pad 39A Tuesday, February 6, 2018 for the maiden demonstration test flight at the Kennedy Space Center. The big rocket is made up of three rocket boosters that will produce more thrust than any other rocket now flying. Photo by Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel/TNS/ABACAPRESS.COM
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A SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from launch Pad 39A Tuesday, February 6, 2018 for the maiden demonstration test flight at the Kennedy Space Center. The big rocket is made up of three rocket boosters that will produce more thrust than any other rocket now flying. Photo by Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel/TNS/ABACAPRESS.COM
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Two Falcon boosters come back to land at Cape Canaveral after SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket lifted off from launch Pad 39A Tuesday, February 6, 2018 for the maiden demonstration test flight at the Kennedy Space Center. The big rocket is made up of three rocket boosters that will produce more thrust than any other rocket now flying. Photo by Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel/TNS/ABACAPRESS.COM
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A SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from launch Pad 39A Tuesday, February 6, 2018 for the maiden demonstration test flight at the Kennedy Space Center. The big rocket is made up of three rocket boosters that will produce more thrust than any other rocket now flying. Photo by Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel/TNS/ABACAPRESS.COM
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A SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from launch Pad 39A Tuesday, February 6, 2018 for the maiden demonstration test flight at the Kennedy Space Center. The big rocket is made up of three rocket boosters that will produce more thrust than any other rocket now flying. Photo by Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel/TNS/ABACAPRESS.COM
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The crowd cheers at Playalinda Beach in the Canaveral National Seashore, just north of the Kennedy Space Center, during the succesful launch of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Playalinda is one of closest public viewing spots to see the launch, about 3 miles from the SpaceX launchpad 39A. Photo by Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS/ABACAPRESS.COM
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Elon Musk, founder, CEO, and lead designer of SpaceX, speaks at a news conference after the Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket launched successfully from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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Elon Musk, founder, CEO, and lead designer of SpaceX, speaks at a news conference after the Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket launched successfully from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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A Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy, has three first-stage boosters, strapped together with 27 engines in all. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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A Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy, has three first-stage boosters, strapped together with 27 engines in all. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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A Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy, has three first-stage boosters, strapped together with 27 engines in all. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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A Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy, has three first-stage boosters, strapped together with 27 engines in all. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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A Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy, has three first-stage boosters, strapped together with 27 engines in all. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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A Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy, has three first-stage boosters, strapped together with 27 engines in all. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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A Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy, has three first-stage boosters, strapped together with 27 engines in all. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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A Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy, has three first-stage boosters, strapped together with 27 engines in all. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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A Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy, has three first-stage boosters, strapped together with 27 engines in all. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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A Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy, has three first-stage boosters, strapped together with 27 engines in all. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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Two booster rockets from the Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy, return for a landing at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/John Raoux), APTOPIX
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Two booster rockets from the Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy, return for a landing at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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Two booster rockets from the Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy, return for a landing at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
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Esta fotograf??a del martes 6 de febrero de 2018 muesra el despegue del nuevo cohete de SpaceX en el Centro Espacial Kenedy, en Cabo Ca?aaveral, Florida. (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel v??a AP)
MANDATORY CREDIT; NO LICENSING EXCEPT BY AP COOPERATIVE MEMBERS
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Two booster rockets from the Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy, return for a landing at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
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A Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy, has three first-stage boosters, strapped together with 27 engines in all. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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A Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy, has three first-stage boosters, strapped together with 27 engines in all. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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A Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy, has three first-stage boosters, strapped together with 27 engines in all. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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A Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. The Falcon Heavy, has three first-stage boosters, strapped together with 27 engines in all. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
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Elon Musk, founder, CEO, and lead designer of SpaceX, speaks at a news conference after the Falcon 9 SpaceX heavy rocket launched successfully from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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February 6, 2018 - Kennedy Space Center, Florida, United States: SpaceX's first Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off on its inaugural test launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 3:45 p.m. EST (2045 GMT). The high-power launcher is attempting to boost Elon Musk's electric Tesla sports car into deep space as a shakedown for future Falcon Heavy missions. (Gene Blevins/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Kennedy Space Center, Florida, United States: SpaceX's first Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off on its inaugural test launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 3:45 p.m. EST (2045 GMT). The high-power launcher is attempting to boost Elon Musk's electric Tesla sports car into deep space as a shakedown for future Falcon Heavy missions. (Gene Blevins/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Kennedy Space Center, Florida, United States: SpaceX's first Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off on its inaugural test launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 3:45 p.m. EST (2045 GMT). The high-power launcher is attempting to boost Elon Musk's electric Tesla sports car into deep space as a shakedown for future Falcon Heavy missions. (Gene Blevins/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Kennedy Space Center, Florida, United States: SpaceX's first Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off on its inaugural test launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 3:45 p.m. EST (2045 GMT). The high-power launcher is attempting to boost Elon Musk's electric Tesla sports car into deep space as a shakedown for future Falcon Heavy missions. (Gene Blevins/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Kennedy Space Center, Florida, United States: SpaceX's first Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off on its inaugural test launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 3:45 p.m. EST (2045 GMT). The high-power launcher is attempting to boost Elon Musk's electric Tesla sports car into deep space as a shakedown for future Falcon Heavy missions. (Gene Blevins/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Kennedy Space Center, Florida, United States: SpaceX's first Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off on its inaugural test launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 3:45 p.m. EST (2045 GMT). The high-power launcher is attempting to boost Elon Musk's electric Tesla sports car into deep space as a shakedown for future Falcon Heavy missions. (Gene Blevins/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Kennedy Space Center, Florida, United States: SpaceX's first Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off on its inaugural test launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 3:45 p.m. EST (2045 GMT). The high-power launcher is attempting to boost Elon Musk's electric Tesla sports car into deep space as a shakedown for future Falcon Heavy missions. (Gene Blevins/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Kennedy Space Center, Florida, United States: SpaceX's first Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off on its inaugural test launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 3:45 p.m. EST (2045 GMT). The high-power launcher is attempting to boost Elon Musk's electric Tesla sports car into deep space as a shakedown for future Falcon Heavy missions. (Gene Blevins/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Kennedy Space Center, Florida, United States: SpaceX's first Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off on its inaugural test launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 3:45 p.m. EST (2045 GMT). The high-power launcher is attempting to boost Elon Musk's electric Tesla sports car into deep space as a shakedown for future Falcon Heavy missions. (Gene Blevins/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Kennedy Space Center, Florida, United States - A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from space complex 39A on its first test flight on February 6, 2018 at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The rocket becomes the most powerful in use today. (Paul Hennessy/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Kennedy Space Center, Florida, United States - Twin booster rockets return for landing following the successful maiden launch of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket from space complex 39A on February 6, 2018 at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The rocket becomes the most powerful in use today. (Paul Hennessy/Polaris)
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy lifts off on it first demonstration flight. The rocket leapt off Pad 39A at 3:45pm. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy lifts off on it first demonstration flight. The rocket leapt off Pad 39A at 3:45pm. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy lifts off on it first demonstration flight. The rocket leapt off Pad 39A at 3:45pm. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; The twin boosters from SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy make a successful landing at Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; The twin boosters from SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy make a successful landing at Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; The twin boosters from SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy make a successful landing at Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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February 6, 2018 - Kennedy Space Center, Florida, United States - SpaceX CEO Elon Musk speaks during a press conference at the Kennedy Space Center after a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket successfully launched from space complex 39A its maiden flight on February 6, 2018 at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The rocket becomes the most powerful in use today. (Paul Hennessy/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Kennedy Space Center, Florida, United States - A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket leaves a plume of smoke after lifting off from space complex 39A on its first test flight on February 6, 2018 at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The rocket becomes the most powerful in use today. (Paul Hennessy/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Kennedy Space Center, Florida, United States - A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from space complex 39A on February 6, 2018 at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The rocket becomes the most powerful in use today. (Paul Hennessy/Polaris)
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy lifts off on it first demonstration flight. The rocket leapt off Pad 39A at 3:45pm. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy lifts off on it first demonstration flight. The rocket leapt off Pad 39A at 3:45pm. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy lifts off on it first demonstration flight. The rocket leapt off Pad 39A at 3:45pm. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy lifts off on it first demonstration flight. The rocket leapt off Pad 39A at 3:45pm. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Cocoa Beach, FL, USA; Crowds of people line the beaches of Cape Canaveral and Cocoa Beach to watch the launch of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy from Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center and the return of the rocket's boosters landing at Landing Zone 1 and 2 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Mandatory Credit: Malcolm Denemark/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Cocoa Beach, FL, USA; Crowds of people line the beaches of Cape Canaveral and Cocoa Beach to watch the launch of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy from Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center and the return of the rocket's boosters landing at Landing Zone 1 and 2 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Mandatory Credit: Malcolm Denemark/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy lifts off on it first demonstration flight. The rocket leapt off Pad 39A at 3:45pm. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; The twin boosters from SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy make a successful landing at Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; The twin boosters from SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy make a successful landing at Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; The twin boosters from SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy make a successful landing at Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy lifts off on it first demonstration flight. The rocket leapt off Pad 39A at 3:45pm. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy lifts off on it first demonstration flight. The rocket leapt off Pad 39A at 3:45pm. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy lifts off on it first demonstration flight. The rocket leapt off Pad 39A at 3:45pm. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; Elon Musk CEO of SpaceX, speaks to the media during a press conference after the Falcon Heavy Launch. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy lifts off on it first demonstration flight. The rocket leapt off Pad 39A at 3:45pm. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; SpaceX's newest rocket, the Falcon Heavy lifts off on it first demonstration flight. The rocket leapt off Pad 39A at 3:45pm. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; Elon Musk CEO of SpaceX, speaks to the media during a press conference after the Falcon Heavy Launch. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; Elon Musk CEO of SpaceX, speaks to the media during a press conference after the Falcon Heavy Launch. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
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Feb 6, 2018; Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; Elon Musk CEO of SpaceX, speaks to the media during a press conference after the Falcon Heavy Launch. Mandatory Credit: Craig Bailey/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
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Feb 6, 2018; Titusville, FL, USA; A general view of teddy bears near Shiloh's Steak & Seafood restaurant on the Titusville shore to watch the SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch. Mandatory Credit: Tim Shortt/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
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Feb 6, 2018; Titusville, FL, USA; Ashley Heribacki and Nancy Robinson of Titusville were among the spectators gathered near Shiloh's Steak & Seafood restaurant on the Titusville shore to watch the SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch. Robinson works for SpaceX, and says "I'm just extremely proud of my teammates!". Mandatory Credit: Tim Shortt/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
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Feb 6, 2018; Titusville, FL, USA; The view from near Shiloh's Steak & Seafood restaurant on the Titusville shore, where hundreds gathered to watch the SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch. Mandatory Credit: Tim Shortt/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
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Feb 6, 2018; Titusville, FL, USA; Spectators crowded near and on the A. Max Brewer Memorial Bridge in Titusville to watch the SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch. Mandatory Credit: Tim Shortt/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
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Feb 6, 2018; Titusville, FL, USA; Spectators crowded the area near Shiloh's Steak & Seafood restaurant on the Titusville shore to watch the SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch. Mandatory Credit: Tim Shortt/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
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Feb 6, 2018; Cape Canaveral, FL, USA; Crowds in Cape Canaveral watch two of the three boosters from the SpaceX heavy land moments apart at Landing Zones 1 and 2 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Mandatory Credit: Malcolm Denemark/Florida Today via USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA
*** World Rights ***
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February 6, 2018 - Cape Canaveral, Florida, United States: SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket took off from Cape Canaveral and soared to space, carrying its payload ? CEO Elon Musk's red Tesla Roadster ? into an orbit that stretches into the asteroid belt. The Falcon Heavy's first flight is finally over, and despite a fudged landing in the ocean, the rocket has shown its prowess and is likely ready to begin missions for customers. This first mission was simply meant to see if the Falcon Heavy could do what it's designed to do: put objects into orbit. That's why its payload was Musk's car which was supposed to be put on a path around the Sun that would take the vehicle out to the distance of Mars' orbit. But the rocket carrying the car seems to have overshot that trajectory and has put the Tesla in an orbit that extends beyond the Red Planet's path. The Tesla won't be making it to the asteroid belt, as Musk originally claimed. The Falcon Heavy took off from a historic launchpad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, called LC-39A. It's the same pad that was used to launch the Apollo 11 mission to the Moon, as well as numerous Space Shuttle flights. SpaceX is currently leasing the site from NASA, and will continue to launch Falcon Heavy flights from the pad for the foreseeable future. (SpaceX/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Cape Canaveral, Florida, United States: SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket took off from Cape Canaveral and soared to space, carrying its payload ? CEO Elon Musk's red Tesla Roadster ? into an orbit that stretches into the asteroid belt. The Falcon Heavy's first flight is finally over, and despite a fudged landing in the ocean, the rocket has shown its prowess and is likely ready to begin missions for customers. This first mission was simply meant to see if the Falcon Heavy could do what it's designed to do: put objects into orbit. That's why its payload was Musk's car which was supposed to be put on a path around the Sun that would take the vehicle out to the distance of Mars' orbit. But the rocket carrying the car seems to have overshot that trajectory and has put the Tesla in an orbit that extends beyond the Red Planet's path. The Tesla won't be making it to the asteroid belt, as Musk originally claimed. The Falcon Heavy took off from a historic launchpad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, called LC-39A. It's the same pad that was used to launch the Apollo 11 mission to the Moon, as well as numerous Space Shuttle flights. SpaceX is currently leasing the site from NASA, and will continue to launch Falcon Heavy flights from the pad for the foreseeable future. (SpaceX/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Cape Canaveral, Florida, United States: SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket took off from Cape Canaveral and soared to space, carrying its payload ? CEO Elon Musk's red Tesla Roadster ? into an orbit that stretches into the asteroid belt. The Falcon Heavy's first flight is finally over, and despite a fudged landing in the ocean, the rocket has shown its prowess and is likely ready to begin missions for customers. This first mission was simply meant to see if the Falcon Heavy could do what it's designed to do: put objects into orbit. That's why its payload was Musk's car which was supposed to be put on a path around the Sun that would take the vehicle out to the distance of Mars' orbit. But the rocket carrying the car seems to have overshot that trajectory and has put the Tesla in an orbit that extends beyond the Red Planet's path. The Tesla won't be making it to the asteroid belt, as Musk originally claimed. The Falcon Heavy took off from a historic launchpad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, called LC-39A. It's the same pad that was used to launch the Apollo 11 mission to the Moon, as well as numerous Space Shuttle flights. SpaceX is currently leasing the site from NASA, and will continue to launch Falcon Heavy flights from the pad for the foreseeable future. (SpaceX/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Cape Canaveral, Florida, United States: SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket took off from Cape Canaveral and soared to space, carrying its payload ? CEO Elon Musk's red Tesla Roadster ? into an orbit that stretches into the asteroid belt. The Falcon Heavy's first flight is finally over, and despite a fudged landing in the ocean, the rocket has shown its prowess and is likely ready to begin missions for customers. This first mission was simply meant to see if the Falcon Heavy could do what it's designed to do: put objects into orbit. That's why its payload was Musk's car which was supposed to be put on a path around the Sun that would take the vehicle out to the distance of Mars' orbit. But the rocket carrying the car seems to have overshot that trajectory and has put the Tesla in an orbit that extends beyond the Red Planet's path. The Tesla won't be making it to the asteroid belt, as Musk originally claimed. The Falcon Heavy took off from a historic launchpad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, called LC-39A. It's the same pad that was used to launch the Apollo 11 mission to the Moon, as well as numerous Space Shuttle flights. SpaceX is currently leasing the site from NASA, and will continue to launch Falcon Heavy flights from the pad for the foreseeable future. (SpaceX/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Cape Canaveral, Florida, United States: SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket took off from Cape Canaveral and soared to space, carrying its payload ? CEO Elon Musk's red Tesla Roadster ? into an orbit that stretches into the asteroid belt. The Falcon Heavy's first flight is finally over, and despite a fudged landing in the ocean, the rocket has shown its prowess and is likely ready to begin missions for customers. This first mission was simply meant to see if the Falcon Heavy could do what it's designed to do: put objects into orbit. That's why its payload was Musk's car which was supposed to be put on a path around the Sun that would take the vehicle out to the distance of Mars' orbit. But the rocket carrying the car seems to have overshot that trajectory and has put the Tesla in an orbit that extends beyond the Red Planet's path. The Tesla won't be making it to the asteroid belt, as Musk originally claimed. The Falcon Heavy took off from a historic launchpad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, called LC-39A. It's the same pad that was used to launch the Apollo 11 mission to the Moon, as well as numerous Space Shuttle flights. SpaceX is currently leasing the site from NASA, and will continue to launch Falcon Heavy flights from the pad for the foreseeable future. (SpaceX/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Cape Canaveral, Florida, United States: SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket took off from Cape Canaveral and soared to space, carrying its payload ? CEO Elon Musk's red Tesla Roadster ? into an orbit that stretches into the asteroid belt. The Falcon Heavy's first flight is finally over, and despite a fudged landing in the ocean, the rocket has shown its prowess and is likely ready to begin missions for customers. This first mission was simply meant to see if the Falcon Heavy could do what it's designed to do: put objects into orbit. That's why its payload was Musk's car which was supposed to be put on a path around the Sun that would take the vehicle out to the distance of Mars' orbit. But the rocket carrying the car seems to have overshot that trajectory and has put the Tesla in an orbit that extends beyond the Red Planet's path. The Tesla won't be making it to the asteroid belt, as Musk originally claimed. The Falcon Heavy took off from a historic launchpad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, called LC-39A. It's the same pad that was used to launch the Apollo 11 mission to the Moon, as well as numerous Space Shuttle flights. SpaceX is currently leasing the site from NASA, and will continue to launch Falcon Heavy flights from the pad for the foreseeable future. (SpaceX/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Cape Canaveral, Florida, United States: SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket took off from Cape Canaveral and soared to space, carrying its payload ? CEO Elon Musk's red Tesla Roadster ? into an orbit that stretches into the asteroid belt. The Falcon Heavy's first flight is finally over, and despite a fudged landing in the ocean, the rocket has shown its prowess and is likely ready to begin missions for customers. This first mission was simply meant to see if the Falcon Heavy could do what it's designed to do: put objects into orbit. That's why its payload was Musk's car which was supposed to be put on a path around the Sun that would take the vehicle out to the distance of Mars' orbit. But the rocket carrying the car seems to have overshot that trajectory and has put the Tesla in an orbit that extends beyond the Red Planet's path. The Tesla won't be making it to the asteroid belt, as Musk originally claimed. The Falcon Heavy took off from a historic launchpad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, called LC-39A. It's the same pad that was used to launch the Apollo 11 mission to the Moon, as well as numerous Space Shuttle flights. SpaceX is currently leasing the site from NASA, and will continue to launch Falcon Heavy flights from the pad for the foreseeable future. (SpaceX/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Cape Canaveral, Florida, United States: SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket took off from Cape Canaveral and soared to space, carrying its payload ? CEO Elon Musk's red Tesla Roadster ? into an orbit that stretches into the asteroid belt. The Falcon Heavy's first flight is finally over, and despite a fudged landing in the ocean, the rocket has shown its prowess and is likely ready to begin missions for customers. This first mission was simply meant to see if the Falcon Heavy could do what it's designed to do: put objects into orbit. That's why its payload was Musk's car which was supposed to be put on a path around the Sun that would take the vehicle out to the distance of Mars' orbit. But the rocket carrying the car seems to have overshot that trajectory and has put the Tesla in an orbit that extends beyond the Red Planet's path. The Tesla won't be making it to the asteroid belt, as Musk originally claimed. The Falcon Heavy took off from a historic launchpad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, called LC-39A. It's the same pad that was used to launch the Apollo 11 mission to the Moon, as well as numerous Space Shuttle flights. SpaceX is currently leasing the site from NASA, and will continue to launch Falcon Heavy flights from the pad for the foreseeable future. (SpaceX/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Cape Canaveral, Florida, United States: SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket took off from Cape Canaveral and soared to space, carrying its payload ? CEO Elon Musk's red Tesla Roadster ? into an orbit that stretches into the asteroid belt. The Falcon Heavy's first flight is finally over, and despite a fudged landing in the ocean, the rocket has shown its prowess and is likely ready to begin missions for customers. This first mission was simply meant to see if the Falcon Heavy could do what it's designed to do: put objects into orbit. That's why its payload was Musk's car which was supposed to be put on a path around the Sun that would take the vehicle out to the distance of Mars' orbit. But the rocket carrying the car seems to have overshot that trajectory and has put the Tesla in an orbit that extends beyond the Red Planet's path. The Tesla won't be making it to the asteroid belt, as Musk originally claimed. The Falcon Heavy took off from a historic launchpad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, called LC-39A. It's the same pad that was used to launch the Apollo 11 mission to the Moon, as well as numerous Space Shuttle flights. SpaceX is currently leasing the site from NASA, and will continue to launch Falcon Heavy flights from the pad for the foreseeable future. (SpaceX/Polaris)
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February 6, 2018 - Cape Canaveral, Florida, United States: SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket took off from Cape Canaveral and soared to space, carrying its payload ? CEO Elon Musk's red Tesla Roadster ? into an orbit that stretches into the asteroid belt. The Falcon Heavy's first flight is finally over, and despite a fudged landing in the ocean, the rocket has shown its prowess and is likely ready to begin missions for customers. This first mission was simply meant to see if the Falcon Heavy could do what it's designed to do: put objects into orbit. That's why its payload was Musk's car which was supposed to be put on a path around the Sun that would take the vehicle out to the distance of Mars' orbit. But the rocket carrying the car seems to have overshot that trajectory and has put the Tesla in an orbit that extends beyond the Red Planet's path. The Tesla won't be making it to the asteroid belt, as Musk originally claimed. The Falcon Heavy took off from a historic launchpad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, called LC-39A. It's the same pad that was used to launch the Apollo 11 mission to the Moon, as well as numerous Space Shuttle flights. SpaceX is currently leasing the site from NASA, and will continue to launch Falcon Heavy flights from the pad for the foreseeable future. (SpaceX/Polaris)
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy rests on Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, before blast off of its demonstration mission. SpaceX is poised for the first test launch February 6 of its Falcon Heavy, which aims to become the world's most powerful rocket in operation, capable of ferrying people to the Moon or Mars some day. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy takes off from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy takes off from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy takes off from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy takes off from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy booster rockets land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on February 6, 2018. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy takes off from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy takes off from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy booster rockets land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on February 6, 2018. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy takes off from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / Bruce WEAVER
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / Bruce WEAVER
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / Bruce WEAVER
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy booster rockets land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on February 6, 2018. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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This still image taken from a SpaceX livestream video shows "Starman" sitting in SpaceX CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster after the Falcon Heavy rocket delivered it into orbit around the Earth on February 2, 2018. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / SPACEX / HO / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / SPACEX" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / SPACEX" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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This still image taken from a SpaceX livestream video shows "Starman" sitting in SpaceX CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster after the Falcon Heavy rocket delivered it into orbit around the Earth on February 2, 2018. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / SPACEX / HO / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / SPACEX" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / SPACEX" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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This still image taken from a SpaceX livestream video shows "Starman" sitting in SpaceX CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster after the Falcon Heavy rocket delivered it into orbit around the Earth on February 2, 2018. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / SPACEX / HO / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / SPACEX" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / SPACEX" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight. About two minutes into the flight, the side boosters peeled away from the center core and landed back on Earth. The third, center booster was to land on an ocean platform but its status is unclear. / AFP PHOTO / Jim WATSON / ALTERNATIVE CROP
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy side booster rockets land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on February 6, 2018. The world's most powerful rocket blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight. About two minutes into the flight, the side boosters peeled away from the center core and landed back on Earth. The third, center booster was to land on an ocean platform but its status is unclear. / AFP PHOTO / Jim WATSON / ALTERNATIVE CROP
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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The SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON
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Start einer SpaceX-Falcon-Rakete foto IPP da video Cape Canaveral 06-02-2018 volo inaugurale del Falcon Heavy realizzato da SpaceX per supportare le prime missioni della futura colonizzazione della Luna e di Marte nella foto la Tesla Roadster contenut aall interno del razzo in un orbita PUBLICATIONxNOTxINxITAxFIN 0
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foto IPP da video Cape Canaveral 06-02-2018 volo inaugurale del Falcon Heavy realizzato da SpaceX per supportare le prime missioni della futura colonizzazione della Luna e di Marte nella foto la Tesla Roadster contenut aall interno del razzo in un orbita PUBLICATIONxNOTxINxITAxFIN 0
imago ist zur Vergabe einer einfachen Nutzungslizenz zum Zeitpunkt der Bereitstellung berechtigt. Pers?nlichkeits- und Markenrechte sowie Bestimmungen des Urheberrechts bzgl. abgebildeter Werke sind zu beachten. Kommerzielle Nutzung in Eigenverantwortung.
EN_01303274_0006
EN_01303274_0006
foto IPP da video Cape Canaveral 06-02-2018 volo inaugurale del Falcon Heavy realizzato da SpaceX per supportare le prime missioni della futura colonizzazione della Luna e di Marte nella foto la Tesla Roadster contenut aall interno del razzo in un orbita PUBLICATIONxNOTxINxITAxFIN 0
imago ist zur Vergabe einer einfachen Nutzungslizenz zum Zeitpunkt der Bereitstellung berechtigt. Pers?nlichkeits- und Markenrechte sowie Bestimmungen des Urheberrechts bzgl. abgebildeter Werke sind zu beachten. Kommerzielle Nutzung in Eigenverantwortung.
EN_01303274_0007
EN_01303274_0007
foto IPP da video Cape Canaveral 06-02-2018 volo inaugurale del Falcon Heavy realizzato da SpaceX per supportare le prime missioni della futura colonizzazione della Luna e di Marte nella foto la Tesla Roadster contenut aall interno del razzo in un orbita PUBLICATIONxNOTxINxITAxFIN 0
imago ist zur Vergabe einer einfachen Nutzungslizenz zum Zeitpunkt der Bereitstellung berechtigt. Pers?nlichkeits- und Markenrechte sowie Bestimmungen des Urheberrechts bzgl. abgebildeter Werke sind zu beachten. Kommerzielle Nutzung in Eigenverantwortung.
EN_01303274_0023
EN_01303274_0023
Enveloped in morning fog, the SpaceX Falcon Heavy sits on launchpad 39A at first light, in this view from Playalinda Beach, Fla. at the Canaveral National Seashore, just north of the Kennedy Space Center, ahead of the rocket's anticipated launch, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. Playalinda is one of closest public viewing spots to see the launch, about 3 miles from the SpaceX launchpad 39A. Photo by Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS/ABACAPRESS.COM
EN_01303274_0024
EN_01303274_0024
Visitors snap photos of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy at Playalinda Beach, Fla. in the Canaveral National Seashore, just north of the Kennedy Space Center, ahead of the rocket's anticipated launch, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. Playalinda is one of closest public viewing spots to see the launch, about 3 miles from the SpaceX launchpad 39A. Photo by Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS/ABACAPRESS.COM

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