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Музей Люфтваффе в Берлине - Sipa (35)

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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010029.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000010
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010030.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000011
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010042.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000023
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010043.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000024
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010036.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000017
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010037.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000018
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010027.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000008
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010054.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000035
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010026.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000007
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010028.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000009
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010032.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000013
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010020.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000001
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010035.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000016
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010021.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000002
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010031.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000012
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010038.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000019
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010023.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000004
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010024.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000005
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010025.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000006
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010039.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000020
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010040.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000021
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010041.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000022
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010047.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000028
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010048.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000029
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010033.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000014
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010034.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000015
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010046.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000027
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010049.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000030
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010050.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000031
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010051.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000032
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010052.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000033
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010044.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000025
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010045.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000026
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010053.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000034
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The airport was built in 1934-35 and originally had been conceived as an academy for Hitler's Luftwaffe officers. Berlin-Gatow was one of the four training airports in Nazi Germany. At the end of the Second World War the complex was Iniozialmente occupied by the Red Army. When Berlin was divided into four parts, Gatow was part of the English sector, and thus became an airport of the RAF from July 1945, playing a key role during the plane bridge to Berlin in 1948-49, when the Allies supported the supplies of Berlin for over a year. Gatow was the second-most allied airport in Berlin, after Tempelhof. In the following decade the airline was used by the British Army Air Corps and formed the gateway to Berlin of the military and political authorities. On June 18, 1994, Union Jack was lowered, the Allies left Berlin now reunified, and the airport was taken over again by the Luftwaffe from September 7, 1994. The infrastructure located south of the airport became a barracks dedicated to General Steinhoff. The hangars, the Watchtower and a good part of the slopes are now occupied by the Luftwaffe Historical Museum. (Photo by Andrea Ronchini/Pacific Press) - PACIFIC1010022.JPG//PACIFICPRESS_xyz00000083_000003