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Огромное минное поле - Афганистан - Exclusivepix (56)

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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: military in Uruzgan, Afghanistan. ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: Halo trust clears minefields in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: victims of a IED attack in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: troops in Uruzgan, Afghanistan. ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0015
EN_01183314_0015
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0017
EN_01183314_0017
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0018
EN_01183314_0018
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0019
EN_01183314_0019
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0020
EN_01183314_0020
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0021
EN_01183314_0021
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0022
EN_01183314_0022
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0023
EN_01183314_0023
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0024
EN_01183314_0024
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0025
EN_01183314_0025
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0026
EN_01183314_0026
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0027
EN_01183314_0027
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0028
EN_01183314_0028
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0029
EN_01183314_0029
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0030
EN_01183314_0030
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0031
EN_01183314_0031
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0032
EN_01183314_0032
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0033
EN_01183314_0033
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0034
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: ICRC orthopic centre in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: Halo trust clears minefields in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: Halo trust clears minefields in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: Halo trust clears minefields in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: Child burn victims of a IED attack in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
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Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: surgical theatre in Boost hopsital, Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0051
EN_01183314_0051
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: surgical theatre in Boost hopsital, Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0052
EN_01183314_0052
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: surgical theatre in Boost hopsital, Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0053
EN_01183314_0053
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: mine victim begging in Mazar-i-sharif, Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0054
EN_01183314_0054
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: home made Bombs ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0055
EN_01183314_0055
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: Halo trust clears minefields in Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media
EN_01183314_0056
EN_01183314_0056
Landmines afghanistan Exclusive Text and photos: Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media Afghanistan is one big minefield. An estimated 10 million mines are spread over the country. Grazing lands, waterways, schools, paths, villages and cities are infested with mainly Anti-personal mines. Landmines were predominantly placed during the civil war in the nineties when Russia fought the Mujehadien freedom fighters. Mine clearance teams in Afghanistan report finding literally dozens of types of landmines, mainly from the ex-USSR, but also from Belgium, Italy, US and the UK. The most infamous mine used during the Soviet Union's occupation period was the so-called 'butterfly' mine. Helicopter crews dropped untold numbers (figures range into the millions) of the small mines from the air. They were designed to flutter to the ground without exploding, and to thousands of children they resembled butterflys or toys. Several demining organisations are working in various places inside Afghanistan but demining is a very slow process. It takes weeks to clear a small piece of land as deminers go inch by inch. Despite the international efforts to demine parts of Afghanistan, it will take another few hundred years to make Afghanistan mine free, at the speed it is going right now. Every day, dozens of civilians across Afghanistan, often children step on landmines and loose limbs or even die. In Afghanistan, accurate and exhaustive figures of the disabled population are not available. Those with mobility impairments could be around one million, of whom approximately 50,000 to 100,000 are limb amputees and their number is constantly increasing. ICRC is the main organization dealing with these victims. Not only providing emergency assistance to mine victims in hospitals, but also to support these victims during recovery in the ICRC physical rehabilitation center in Kabul. Here victims receive prostheses and extensive physical rehabilitation. After months of rehab, most of them are able to find their way back into society. But as Afghanistan is getting more dangerous every day, work of relief work and demining will also become more difficult. While mine victims will increase every day Photo shows: surgical theatre in Boost hopsital, Afghanistan ?Ton Koene/Exclusivepix Media