Понедельник, 17 декабря 2018
Закрыть [x]
to:

Варшава - Polaris (51)

Eyevine репортажи
Sipa Press Russia
Redux - репортажи
Репортажи AFP
Репортажи Polaris

корзины

Вы должны войти в систему, чтобы иметь доступ к корзине

 

EN_01181680_0006
! EN_01181680_0006
February 18, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: People drink wine during the opening of an art exhibition at the gallery Salon Akademii. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0023
! EN_01181680_0023
February 18, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A man admires an installation during the opening of an art exhibition at the gallery Salon Akademii. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0024
! EN_01181680_0024
February 18, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A woman and a child admire an installation during the opening of an art exhibition at the gallery Salon Akademii. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0028
! EN_01181680_0028
February 18, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: The ceremony of the changing of the guard near the Saxon Garden. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0031
! EN_01181680_0031
February 18, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: People drink wine during the opening of an art exhibition at the gallery Salon Akademii. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0033
! EN_01181680_0033
February 18, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A night view of Palac Kulturi. The building built by Stalin is the tallest building in Warsaw (231 meters). Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0034
! EN_01181680_0034
February 18, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: The Stadion Narodowy built on the occasion of European football in 2012 that were awarded to Poland and Ukraine. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0005
! EN_01181680_0005
February 17, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A portrait of an editor of the Polish quarterly journal Think Tank. The magazine, published since the spring of 2009, deals with fashion, culture, trends and companies and is headquartered in the Soho Factory, in the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0007
! EN_01181680_0007
February 17, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: An actor of Studio Teatralne Kolo. The theater is located in the Soho Factory, in the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0009
! EN_01181680_0009
February 17, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: An actor of Studio Teatralne Kolo. The theater is located in the Soho Factory, in the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0012
! EN_01181680_0012
February 17, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: An actor of Studio Teatralne Kolo. The theater is located in the Soho Factory, in the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0025
! EN_01181680_0025
February 18, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A general view from a bus of Stadion Narodowy, built on the occasion of European football in 2012 that were awarded to Poland and Ukraine. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0026
! EN_01181680_0026
February 17, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: An interactive lesson at Viamoda industrial, the university of design, fashion and technology management. The institute is located in the Soho Factory, in the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0030
! EN_01181680_0030
February 17, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A shop assistant inside manufacturing atelier Krawiec Wnetrz. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0032
! EN_01181680_0032
February 17, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: An old bus and a vintage car near the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0035
! EN_01181680_0035
February 17, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A mural near the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0037
! EN_01181680_0037
February 17, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A mural near the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0038
! EN_01181680_0038
February 17, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A portrait of a worker at Galeria Leto in the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0040
! EN_01181680_0040
February 17, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A portrait of Martha Kolakowska, director of the Galeria Leto. The art gallery is in the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0047
! EN_01181680_0047
February 17, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: Two young entrepreneurs sit on one of the large pillows that they produce, for the furnishing of public places and bathing facilities. Their shop is located in the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0051
! EN_01181680_0051
February 17, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A shop assistant inside manufacturing atelier Krawiec Wnetrz. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0004
! EN_01181680_0004
February 16, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: Installations at Neon Muzeum. The museum, which was launched in 2005 by Ilona Karwinska (second left) and David Hill (second right) with the purpose of saving the neon lights and neon signs of the post-war period, is based in the Soho Factory, in the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0011
! EN_01181680_0011
February 16, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A portrait of David Hill, founder and director of Neon Muzeum. The museum, which was launched in 2005 with the purpose of saving the neon lights and neon signs of the post-war period, is based in the Soho Factory, in the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0014
! EN_01181680_0014
February 16, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: Installations at Neon Muzeum. The museum, which was launched in 2005 by Ilona Karwi?ska (second from left) and David Hill (third from left) with the purpose of saving the neon lights and neon signs of the post-war period, is based in the Soho Factory, in the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0016
! EN_01181680_0016
February 16, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A portrait of Ilona Karwinskal, founder and director of Neon Muzeum. The museum, which was launched in 2005 with the purpose of saving the neon lights and neon signs of the post-war period, is based in the Soho Factory, in the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0018
! EN_01181680_0018
February 16, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: Young people drink and have fun at one of the many disco clubs. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0021
! EN_01181680_0021
February 16, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A DJ plays music at one of the many disco clubs. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0048
! EN_01181680_0048
February 16, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A portrait of David Hill, founder and director of Neon Muzeum. The museum, which was launched in 2005 with the purpose of saving the neon lights and neon signs of the post-war period, is based in the Soho Factory, in the Prague neighborhood. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0049
! EN_01181680_0049
February 16, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: Installations at Neon Muzeum. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0013
! EN_01181680_0013
February 15, 2015 - Warsaw, Poland: Visitors at Muzeum Narodove. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0015
! EN_01181680_0015
February 15, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: The manager of Mito Art cafe books. The literary cafe is a reference point for young Polish artists who may exhibit their art works during the year. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0017
! EN_01181680_0017
February 15, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A man walks the streets of the old town. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0019
! EN_01181680_0019
February 15, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A woman at work at Muzeum Narodove. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0041
! EN_01181680_0041
February 15, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A girl visits Muzeum Narodove. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0002
! EN_01181680_0002
February 14, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A man talks on the phone in a park of the city center. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0003
! EN_01181680_0003
February 14, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: Two boys play with interactive experiments at the Centrum Nauki Kopernik. The building dedicated to Copernicus is located in the center of the capital and features interactive exhibitions, a planetarium and a conference center. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0008
! EN_01181680_0008
February 14, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A general view of the economic heart of the city. In the downtown area, there are many modern skyscrapers that surround the Palace of Culture and Science. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0022
! EN_01181680_0022
February 14, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A boy plays with interactive experiments at the Centrum Nauki Kopernik. The building dedicated to Copernicus is located in the center of the capital and features interactive exhibitions, a planetarium and a conference center. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0029
! EN_01181680_0029
February 14, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: People struggle with interactive experiments at the Centrum Nauki Kopernik. The building dedicated to Copernicus is located in the center of the capital and features interactive exhibitions, a planetarium and a conference center. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0036
! EN_01181680_0036
February 14, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A general view of the economic heart of the city. In the downtown area, there are many modern skyscrapers that surround the Palace of Culture and Science. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0046
! EN_01181680_0046
February 14, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A show of robots inside the Centrum Nauki Kopernik. The building dedicated to Copernicus is located in the center of the capital and features interactive exhibitions, a planetarium and a conference center. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0001
! EN_01181680_0001
February 13, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A general view of the Vistula River, the longest of the nation. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0010
! EN_01181680_0010
February 13, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: People waiting at the bus stop, in the Mariensztat area. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0020
! EN_01181680_0020
February 13, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A portrait of a University of Warsaw student. The University of Warsaw, founded in 1945, is the largest and one of the most prestigious in Poland. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0027
! EN_01181680_0027
February 13, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A man on a computer inside Fenomenalna coffee at Warsaw University. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0039
! EN_01181680_0039
February 13, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: The Ogrod Krasinskich park. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0042
! EN_01181680_0042
February 13, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A building in 'Stare Miasto,' the historic center of the city. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0043
! EN_01181680_0043
February 13, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: People walk in the streets of the old town. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0044
! EN_01181680_0044
February 13, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: People walk near Plac Zamkowy in the historic center of the city. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0045
! EN_01181680_0045
February 13, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: A tourist guide gives explanations to a group of visitors at Plac Zamkowy in the historic center of the city. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)
EN_01181680_0050
! EN_01181680_0050
February 13, 2014 - Warsaw, Poland: An audio installation of the Polish artist Elzbieta Wierzbicka. Poland was the only European country which in recent years has managed to avoid recession produced by the global crisis of 2007-2009, living on the contrary its economic boom thanks to European Union funds, too. The fortune of Poland was to join the EU on the eve of the credit crunch, thus avoiding debt as it happened in other nations. Thanks to expansionary and forward-looking economic policies, the Polish economy has grown by 177 percent from 1989 to 2007, at higher rate than that of all other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In 2004, when Poland joined the EU, it was already able to compete with the most advanced economies. Today, walking through the streets of Warsaw, the Polish capital, you feel a strong sense of vitality and efficiency. Around the Palace of Culture and Science, the economic and commercial center of the city emerges, characterized by an unusual mix of futuristic buildings and huge skyscrapers. Some areas of the city are experiencing a period of strong growth, such as the neighborhood 'Prague,' located on the right bank of the Vistula. 'Prague,' for a few decades a working-class neighborhood abandoned after the Second World War and with the reputation of a dangerous zone, has now become the heart of the artistic and cultural life of the city. In the district, one of the oldest in Warsaw, were born galleries, atelier of young artists, sharing studios, experimental laboratories, etc. (Alessio Paduano/Polaris)