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Нобелевская премия 2021 по химии присуждена за асимметрический органокатализ (150)

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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, smiles as he is interviewed outside the Frick Chemistry Laboratory and Department of Chemistry at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan were awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. (AP Photo/John Minchillo), APTOPIX
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TOPSHOT - The co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List cheers at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021, prior to a press conference. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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Goran K Hansson, Permanent Secretary of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, centre, announces the winners of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, in Stockholm, Sweden, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021. Professor Pernilla Wittung-Stafhede, is seated at left and Professor Peter Somfai at right. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an ??singenious??? new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed ??sasymmetric organocatalysis.??? Goran Hansson of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said Wednesday that work has already had a significant impact on pharmaceutical research. (Claudio Bresciani/TT New Agency via AP)
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A view of the screen as the winners of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry are announced, in Stockholm, Sweden, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an ??singenious??? new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed ??sasymmetric organocatalysis.??? Goran Hansson of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said Wednesday that work has already had a significant impact on pharmaceutical research. (Claudio Bresciani/TT New Agency via AP)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, smiles as he is interviewed outside the Frick Chemistry Laboratory and Department of Chemistry at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan were awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, smiles as he is interviewed outside the Frick Chemistry Laboratory and Department of Chemistry at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan were awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, is interviewed outside the Frick Chemistry Laboratory and Department of Chemistry at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan were awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, is interviewed outside the Frick Chemistry Laboratory and Department of Chemistry at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan were awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, is interviewed outside the Frick Chemistry Laboratory and Department of Chemistry at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan were awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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German Chemist Benjamin List poses for a photo, in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an ??singenious??? and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan has allowed scientists to produce those molecules more cheaply, efficiently, safely ??" and with significantly less environmental impact. (AP Photo/Michael Corder)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, is interviewed outside the Frick Chemistry Laboratory and Department of Chemistry at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan were awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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German scientist Benjamin List drinks champagne as arrives at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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German scientist Benjamin List waves out of a car as he arrives at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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German scientist Benjamin List waves out of a car as he arrives at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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German scientist Benjamin List poses next to a poster with a medal of Alfred Nobel as arrives at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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German scientist Benjamin List drinks champagne as arrives at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner), APTOPIX
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German scientist Benjamin List arrives at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021 after he was informed about winining the Nobel Prize for chemistry. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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German scientist Benjamin List arrives at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021 after he was informed about winining the Nobel Prize for chemistry. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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German scientist Benjamin List arrives at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021 after he was informed about winining the Nobel Prize for chemistry. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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German scientist Benjamin List arrives at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021 after he was informed about winining the Nobel Prize for chemistry. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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German scientist Benjamin List cheers to the employees on the balcony after he arrived at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021 after he was informed about winining the Nobel Prize for chemistry. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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German scientist Benjamin List celebrates with champagne after he arrived at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021 after he was informed about winining the Nobel Prize for chemistry. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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German scientist Benjamin List arrives at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021 after he was informed about winining the Nobel Prize for chemistry. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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German scientist Benjamin List arrives at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021 after he was informed about winining the Nobel Prize for chemistry. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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German scientist Benjamin List arrives at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021 after he was informed about winining the Nobel Prize for chemistry. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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German scientist Benjamin List arrives at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021 after he was informed about winining the Nobel Prize for chemistry. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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German scientist Benjamin List is pictured after he arrived at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021 after he was informed about winining the Nobel Prize for chemistry. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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German scientist Benjamin List arrives at the Max-Planck-Institute for Coal Research in Muelheim, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021 after he was informed about winining the Nobel Prize for chemistry. Two scientists have won the Nobel Prize for chemistry for finding an "ingenious" new way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan developed "asymmetric organocatalysis." (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, speaks during a news conference at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan were awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make a variety of compounds, including medicines and pesticides. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, speaks during a news conference at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born MacMillan were awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make a variety of compounds, including medicines and pesticides. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, speaks during a news conference at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born MacMillan was awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make a variety of compounds, including medicines and pesticides. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, speaks during a news conference at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born MacMillan was awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make a variety of compounds, including medicines and pesticides. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, speaks during a news conference at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born MacMillan was awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make a variety of compounds, including medicines and pesticides. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, speaks during a news conference at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born MacMillan was awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make a variety of compounds, including medicines and pesticides. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, speaks during a news conference at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born MacMillan was awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make a variety of compounds, including medicines and pesticides. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, speaks during a news conference at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born MacMillan was awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make a variety of compounds, including medicines and pesticides. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, speaks during a news conference at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born MacMillan was awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make a variety of compounds, including medicines and pesticides. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, second from right, speaks during a news conference at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born MacMillan was awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make a variety of compounds, including medicines and pesticides. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, holds a glass of champagne following a news conference at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born MacMillan was awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make a variety of compounds, including medicines and pesticides. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, right, leaves a news conference with family at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born MacMillan was awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make a variety of compounds, including medicines and pesticides. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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David W.C. MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, right, leaves a news conference with family at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born MacMillan was awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make a variety of compounds, including medicines and pesticides. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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From left, Princeton University Nobel Prize laureates Eric Francis Wieschaus, biologist, Joseph Hooton Taylor Jr., astrophysicist, David W.C. MacMillan, Duncan Haldane, physicist, Angus Deaton, economist, and Christopher Sims, economist, raise a glass in honor of MacMillan, one of two winners of the Nobel Prize for chemistry, at Princeton University, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, in Princeton, N.J. The work of Benjamin List of Germany and Scotland-born David W.C. MacMillan were awarded for finding an "ingenious" and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that can be used to make everything from medicines to food flavorings. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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(L-R) Member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Pernilla Wittung Stafshede, Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Peter Somfai address a press conference to announce the winners of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry (On diplay L-R) Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States, at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - (On diplay L-R) Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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(Bottom L-R) Member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Pernilla Wittung Stafshede, Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Peter Somfai address a press conference to announce the winners of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry (On display L-R) Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States, at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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(Bottom L-R) Member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Pernilla Wittung Stafshede, Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Peter Somfai address a press conference to announce the winners of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry (On display L-R) Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States, at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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(Bottom L-R) Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Peter Somfai address a press conference to announce the co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry (On display) Germany's Benjamin List, at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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(Bottom L-R) Member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Pernilla Wittung Stafshede and Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences look on as member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Peter Somfai speaks during a press conference on the work of co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List (On display), at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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(Bottom L-R) Member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Pernilla Wittung Stafshede and Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences look on as member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Peter Somfai speaks during a press conference on the work of co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List (On display), at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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A screen displays the co-winners of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List (L) and David MacMillan of the United States, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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A screen displays the co-winners of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List (L) and David MacMillan of the United States, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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A screen displays the co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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A screen displays the co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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Member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Pernilla Wittung Stafshede, Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Peter Somfai address a press conference to announce the co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List (On display) at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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(Bottom L-R) Member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Pernilla Wittung Stafshede, Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Peter Somfai address a press conference to announce the winners of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, (On display L-R) Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States, at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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A screen displays the co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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(Bottom L-R) Member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Pernilla Wittung Stafshede and Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences look on as member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Peter Somfai speaks during a press conference on the work of co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List (On display), at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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(Bottom L-R) Member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Pernilla Wittung Stafshede and Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences look on as member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Peter Somfai speaks during a press conference on the work of co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, David MacMillan of the United States (On display), at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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Member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Peter Somfai speaks during a press conference on the work of co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List (On display), at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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(L-R) Member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Pernilla Wittung Stafshede and Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences look on as member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Peter Somfai speaks during a press conference on the work of the co-winners of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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(L-R) Member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Pernilla Wittung Stafshede and Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences look on as member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Peter Somfai speaks during a press conference on the work of the co-winners of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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(L-R) Member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Pernilla Wittung Stafshede and Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences look on as member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Peter Somfai speaks during a press conference on the work of the co-winners of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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(Back L-R) Member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Pernilla Wittung Stafshede and Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences look on as member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry Peter Somfai speaks during a press conference on the work of the co-winners of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
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A molecule model named "Proline" developped by co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List, Richard A. Lerner and Carlos F. Barbas II, is pictured ahead of a press statement at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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A molecule model named "Proline" developped by co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List, Richard A. Lerner and Carlos F. Barbas II, is pictured ahead of a press statement at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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A co-worker at the Max Planck Institute hang a poster about the win of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2021 ahead of a press statement at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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Co-workers at the Max Planck Institute hang a poster of the Nobel Prize ahead of a press statement at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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Co-workers at the Max Planck Institute hang two posters about the Nobel Prize ahead of a press statement at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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Co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List reacts prior to a press conference at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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The co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List cheers with a bouquet of flowers prior to a press conference at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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EN_01496441_1608
The co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List cheers with a bouquet of flowers and is applauded by colleagues at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021, prior to a press conference. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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EN_01496441_1609
Co-workers applaud from the balconies the co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List, prior to a press conference at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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EN_01496441_1610
The co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List cheers with a bouquet of flowers and is applauded by colleagues at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021, prior to a press conference. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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Co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List poses for a picture next to a poster of the Nobel Prize prior to a press conference at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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Co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List smiles prior to a press conference at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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Co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List smiles prior to a press conference at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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The co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List cheers with a bouquet of flowers and is applauded by colleagues at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021, prior to a press conference. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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The co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List cheers with a bottle of sparkling wine and is applauded by colleagues at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021, prior to a press conference. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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The co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List cheers with a bottle of sparkling wine and is applauded by colleagues at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021, prior to a press conference. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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EN_01496441_1626
The co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List cheers with a bottle of sparkling wine and is applauded by colleagues at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021, prior to a press conference. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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EN_01496441_1627
The co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List cheers with a bottle of sparkling wine and is applauded by colleagues at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021, prior to a press conference. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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EN_01496441_1628
The co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List cheers at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021, prior to a press conference. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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EN_01496441_1629
Co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List reacts next to a poster of the Nobel Prize prior to a press conference at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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Co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List poses for a picture next to a poster of the Nobel Prize prior to a press conference at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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EN_01496441_1631
Co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List poses for a picture next to a poster of the Nobel Prize prior to a press conference at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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EN_01496441_1632
Co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List poses for a picture next to a poster of the Nobel Prize prior to a press conference at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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Co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List is pictured during a press statement at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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Co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List speaks during a press statement at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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Co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List (R) is pictured with his son Paul (L) and wife Sabine (C) during a press statement at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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Co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List is pictured during a press statement at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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Co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List speaks and gesticulates during a press statement at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
EN_01496441_1642
EN_01496441_1642
Co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List speaks and gesticulates during a press statement at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
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EN_01496441_1643
Co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Germany's Benjamin List speaks and gesticulates during a press statement at the Max Planck Institute in Muehlheim, western Germany on October 6, 2021. - Germany's Benjamin List and David MacMillan of the United States on October 6, 2021 won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction, the jury said. The duo was awarded "for their development of a precise new tool for molecular construction: organocatalysis. This has had a great impact on pharmaceutical research, and has made chemistry greener," the Nobel Committee said. (Photo by Ina Fassbender / AFP)
EN_01496441_1985
EN_01496441_1985
Princeton University professor David MacMillan speaks at a press conference on October 6, 2021 in Princeton, New Jersey. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
EN_01496441_1986
EN_01496441_1986
Princeton University professor David MacMillan speaks at a press conference on October 6, 2021 in Princeton, New Jersey. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
EN_01496441_1987
EN_01496441_1987
Princeton University professor David MacMillan speaks at a press conference on October 6, 2021 in Princeton, New Jersey. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
EN_01496441_1988
EN_01496441_1988
Princeton University professor David MacMillan speaks at a press conference on October 6, 2021 in Princeton, New Jersey. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
EN_01496441_1991
EN_01496441_1991
Princeton University professor David MacMillan speaks at a press conference on October 6, 2021 in Princeton, New Jersey. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
EN_01496441_1992
EN_01496441_1992
Princeton University professor David MacMillan speaks at a press conference on October 6, 2021 in Princeton, New Jersey. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
EN_01496441_1993
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Princeton University professor David MacMillan (2nd L) speaks at a press conference on October 6, 2021 in Princeton, New Jersey. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
EN_01496441_1997
EN_01496441_1997
Princeton University professor David MacMillan (2nd L) speaks at a press conference on October 6, 2021 in Princeton, New Jersey. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
EN_01496441_2007
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Princeton University professor David MacMillan arrives for a press conference on October 6, 2021 in Princeton, New Jersey. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
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EN_01496441_2058
Princeton University professor David MacMillan leaves after speaking at a press conference at Richardson Auditorium in Princeton University, New Jersey on October 6,2021. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
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EN_01496441_2059
Princeton University professor David MacMillan leaves after speaking at a press conference at Richardson Auditorium in Princeton University, New Jersey on October 6,2021. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
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EN_01496441_2060
Princeton University professor David MacMillan leaves after speaking at a press conference at Richardson Auditorium in Princeton University, New Jersey on October 6,2021. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
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EN_01496441_2061
Princeton University professor David MacMillan poses for pictures with students after speaking at a press conference at Richardson Auditorium in Princeton University, New Jersey on October 6,2021. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
EN_01496441_2062
EN_01496441_2062
Princeton University professor David MacMillan leaves after speaking at a press conference at Richardson Auditorium in Princeton University, New Jersey on October 6,2021. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
EN_01496441_2063
EN_01496441_2063
Princeton University professor David MacMillan sticks out his tongue while raising a toast with other Nobel laureates in Princeton University, New Jersey after he was Awarded Nobel Prize In Chemistry on October 6, 2021. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
EN_01496441_2064
EN_01496441_2064
Princeton University professor David MacMillan (2nd-L) speaks with other Nobel laureates in Princeton University, New Jersey after he was Awarded Nobel Prize In Chemistry on October 6, 2021. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
EN_01496441_2079
EN_01496441_2079
Princeton University professor David MacMillan raises his glass in Princeton University, New Jersey after he was Awarded Nobel Prize In Chemistry on October 6, 2021. - MacMillan and Germany's Benjamin List won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their work developing a new tool to scale up chemical reactions in an environmentally friendly way, known as "organocatalysis." (Photo by Bryan R. Smith / AFP)
EN_01496652_0001
EN_01496652_0001
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Benjamin List (front l), 2021 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Director at the MPI for Coal Research, stands with a glass of champagne among his staff and students after a press conference at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to the German Benjamin List and the US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0002
EN_01496652_0002
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Benjamin List, 2021 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Director at the MPI for Coal Research, rejoices on arrival at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research; in the background on the balconies are staff and students of the Institute. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to the German Benjamin List and the US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0003
EN_01496652_0003
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Benjamin List, 2021 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Director at the MPI for Coal Research, rejoices on arrival at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research; in the background on the balconies are staff and students of the Institute. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to the German Benjamin List and the US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0004
EN_01496652_0004
06 October 2021, Sweden, Stockholm: Johan ?qvist of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry looks into the camera. (to dpa "Nobel expert: "High time" for award for List and MacMillan") Photo: Steffen Trumpf/dpa
EN_01496652_0005
EN_01496652_0005
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: The model of a proline molecule that Benjamin List worked on stands in a display case outside a press conference at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research. A photo of a Nobel Medal can be seen in the background. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry will go to the German Benjamin List and the Scottish-born US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0006
EN_01496652_0006
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: The model of a proline molecule Benjamin List worked on stands in a display case outside a press conference at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry will go to the German Benjamin List and the Scottish-born US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0009
EN_01496652_0009
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Students attach a sign reading "Chemistry Nobel Prize 2021" to a window before a press conference at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry will go to German Benjamin List, director at the MPI for Coal Research, and US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0010
EN_01496652_0010
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Benjamin List (r), 2021 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Director at the MPI for Coal Research, stands with his son Paul (l) and his wife Sabine during a press conference at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to the German Benjamin List and the US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0011
EN_01496652_0011
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Benjamin List, 2021 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Director at the MPI for Coal Research, stands in front of a photo of a Nobel Medal before the start of a press conference at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry will go to the German Benjamin List and the US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0012
EN_01496652_0012
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Exterior view of the Max Planck Institute for Coal Research. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry will go to the German Benjamin List, Director of Homogeneous Catalysis at the MPI for Coal Research, and the Scottish-born US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0013
EN_01496652_0013
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Benjamin List, 2021 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Director at the MPI for Coal Research, stands in front of a photo of a Nobel Medal before the start of a press conference at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry will go to the German Benjamin List and the US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0014
EN_01496652_0014
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Benjamin List (M), 2021 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Director at the MPI for Coal Research, stands with a glass of champagne among his staff and students after a press conference at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to the German Benjamin List and the US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0015
EN_01496652_0015
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Benjamin List, 2021 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Director at the MPI for Coal Research, speaks at a press conference at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to the German Benjamin List and the US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0016
EN_01496652_0016
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Benjamin List, 2021 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Director at the MPI for Coal Research, speaks at a press conference at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to the German Benjamin List and the US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0017
EN_01496652_0017
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Benjamin List, 2021 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Director at the MPI for Coal Research, speaks at a press conference at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to the German Benjamin List and the US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0018
EN_01496652_0018
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Students and staff of the institute stand on the balcony waiting for the arrival of Benjamin List, 2021 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Director at the MPI for Coal Research, at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to the German Benjamin List and the US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0019
EN_01496652_0019
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Benjamin List, 2021 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Director at the MPI for Coal Research, stands in front of a photo of a Nobel Medal before the start of a press conference at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry will go to the German Benjamin List and the US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0020
EN_01496652_0020
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Benjamin List, 2021 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Director at the MPI for Coal Research, rejoices on arrival at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research; in the background on the balconies are staff and students of the Institute. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to the German Benjamin List and the US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa
EN_01496652_0021
EN_01496652_0021
06 October 2021, North Rhine-Westphalia, Mulheim An Der Ruhr: Benjamin List, 2021 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Director at the MPI for Coal Research, drinks upon arrival at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Coal Research, with staff and students of the Institute in the background on the balconies. The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to the German Benjamin List and the US researcher MacMillan for methods to accelerate chemical reactions. Photo: Federico Gambarini/dpa

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