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Детёныш шимпанзе в зоопарке Мэриленда (12)

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A US zoo is celebrating - after finally choosing a name for its newest baby chimp. Staff at Maryland Zoo called on fans to help name the latest addition to their chimpanzee troop. And after more than 9500 votes were cast, the winner was announced - Maisie. The name beat out runners-up including Asha, Olivia, Nyota and Tulia. The names in the contest were selected by the Chimpanzee Forest animal care team members, who have been caring for the littlest chimp around the clock at the Baltimore facility. ?We?re so happy she officially has a name,? said Pam Carter, Chimpanzee Forest area manager. ?Animal care staff use individual names, especially during training sessions. The chimpanzees all recognize their own names as well as each other?s and being able to call her Maisie will help us make the important introductions to the troop when she is ready.? Maisie arrived at the zoo in late September. She was born at the Oklahoma City Zoo on August 28. But she was moved to be hand-reared and paired with a surrogate chimp mother after her birth mother was unable to care for her properly. She was born weighing approximately four pounds to first-time mother Nia, a 12-year-old chimpanzee. Pace Frank, lead primate caretaker at the Oklahoma City Zoo, said: "It was quickly apparent that Nia was not adapting to motherhood appropriately and we made the difficult decision to remove and hand-rear the baby while searching for a suitable home with a nurturing surrogate.? The Chimp Forest Animal Care team who work in three shifts day and night to provide her constant care. ?Maisie drinks baby formula every three hours, sleeps, and has some playtime every day to help strengthen her muscles,?Pam Carter said. ?We also wear a shirt and blanket that have fringe material sewn on that helps her learn to grip.? Maisie can now roll over by herself and she can also pull herself up into a sitting position, the zoo said. Chimpanzees are classified as endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List. ?Another reason we give recognizable names to animals in our care is that it helps create a unique bond between the animal and our visitors,? said Margaret Rose-Innes, assistant general curator. ?We hope that if they learn to care for the individual, they will also care about what we are doing to save that species, which is so important not just for our future generations, but also for the future of Maisie?s wild cousins.? Maisie brings the Maryland Zoo?s chimpanzee troop up to fifteen, which includes one-year-old Lola and ten-month-old Violet. Please credit Courtesy of Maryland Zoo / MEGA. 12 Nov 2020 Pictured: Baby chimp Maisie at Maryland Zoo. Photo credit: Courtesy of Maryland Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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A US zoo is celebrating - after finally choosing a name for its newest baby chimp. Staff at Maryland Zoo called on fans to help name the latest addition to their chimpanzee troop. And after more than 9500 votes were cast, the winner was announced - Maisie. The name beat out runners-up including Asha, Olivia, Nyota and Tulia. The names in the contest were selected by the Chimpanzee Forest animal care team members, who have been caring for the littlest chimp around the clock at the Baltimore facility. ?We?re so happy she officially has a name,? said Pam Carter, Chimpanzee Forest area manager. ?Animal care staff use individual names, especially during training sessions. The chimpanzees all recognize their own names as well as each other?s and being able to call her Maisie will help us make the important introductions to the troop when she is ready.? Maisie arrived at the zoo in late September. She was born at the Oklahoma City Zoo on August 28. But she was moved to be hand-reared and paired with a surrogate chimp mother after her birth mother was unable to care for her properly. She was born weighing approximately four pounds to first-time mother Nia, a 12-year-old chimpanzee. Pace Frank, lead primate caretaker at the Oklahoma City Zoo, said: "It was quickly apparent that Nia was not adapting to motherhood appropriately and we made the difficult decision to remove and hand-rear the baby while searching for a suitable home with a nurturing surrogate.? The Chimp Forest Animal Care team who work in three shifts day and night to provide her constant care. ?Maisie drinks baby formula every three hours, sleeps, and has some playtime every day to help strengthen her muscles,?Pam Carter said. ?We also wear a shirt and blanket that have fringe material sewn on that helps her learn to grip.? Maisie can now roll over by herself and she can also pull herself up into a sitting position, the zoo said. Chimpanzees are classified as endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List. ?Another reason we give recognizable names to animals in our care is that it helps create a unique bond between the animal and our visitors,? said Margaret Rose-Innes, assistant general curator. ?We hope that if they learn to care for the individual, they will also care about what we are doing to save that species, which is so important not just for our future generations, but also for the future of Maisie?s wild cousins.? Maisie brings the Maryland Zoo?s chimpanzee troop up to fifteen, which includes one-year-old Lola and ten-month-old Violet. Please credit Courtesy of Maryland Zoo / MEGA. 12 Nov 2020 Pictured: Baby chimp Maisie at Maryland Zoo. Photo credit: Courtesy of Maryland Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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A US zoo is celebrating - after finally choosing a name for its newest baby chimp. Staff at Maryland Zoo called on fans to help name the latest addition to their chimpanzee troop. And after more than 9500 votes were cast, the winner was announced - Maisie. The name beat out runners-up including Asha, Olivia, Nyota and Tulia. The names in the contest were selected by the Chimpanzee Forest animal care team members, who have been caring for the littlest chimp around the clock at the Baltimore facility. ?We?re so happy she officially has a name,? said Pam Carter, Chimpanzee Forest area manager. ?Animal care staff use individual names, especially during training sessions. The chimpanzees all recognize their own names as well as each other?s and being able to call her Maisie will help us make the important introductions to the troop when she is ready.? Maisie arrived at the zoo in late September. She was born at the Oklahoma City Zoo on August 28. But she was moved to be hand-reared and paired with a surrogate chimp mother after her birth mother was unable to care for her properly. She was born weighing approximately four pounds to first-time mother Nia, a 12-year-old chimpanzee. Pace Frank, lead primate caretaker at the Oklahoma City Zoo, said: "It was quickly apparent that Nia was not adapting to motherhood appropriately and we made the difficult decision to remove and hand-rear the baby while searching for a suitable home with a nurturing surrogate.? The Chimp Forest Animal Care team who work in three shifts day and night to provide her constant care. ?Maisie drinks baby formula every three hours, sleeps, and has some playtime every day to help strengthen her muscles,?Pam Carter said. ?We also wear a shirt and blanket that have fringe material sewn on that helps her learn to grip.? Maisie can now roll over by herself and she can also pull herself up into a sitting position, the zoo said. Chimpanzees are classified as endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List. ?Another reason we give recognizable names to animals in our care is that it helps create a unique bond between the animal and our visitors,? said Margaret Rose-Innes, assistant general curator. ?We hope that if they learn to care for the individual, they will also care about what we are doing to save that species, which is so important not just for our future generations, but also for the future of Maisie?s wild cousins.? Maisie brings the Maryland Zoo?s chimpanzee troop up to fifteen, which includes one-year-old Lola and ten-month-old Violet. Please credit Courtesy of Maryland Zoo / MEGA. 12 Nov 2020 Pictured: Baby chimp Maisie at Maryland Zoo. Photo credit: Courtesy of Maryland Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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A US zoo is celebrating - after finally choosing a name for its newest baby chimp. Staff at Maryland Zoo called on fans to help name the latest addition to their chimpanzee troop. And after more than 9500 votes were cast, the winner was announced - Maisie. The name beat out runners-up including Asha, Olivia, Nyota and Tulia. The names in the contest were selected by the Chimpanzee Forest animal care team members, who have been caring for the littlest chimp around the clock at the Baltimore facility. ?We?re so happy she officially has a name,? said Pam Carter, Chimpanzee Forest area manager. ?Animal care staff use individual names, especially during training sessions. The chimpanzees all recognize their own names as well as each other?s and being able to call her Maisie will help us make the important introductions to the troop when she is ready.? Maisie arrived at the zoo in late September. She was born at the Oklahoma City Zoo on August 28. But she was moved to be hand-reared and paired with a surrogate chimp mother after her birth mother was unable to care for her properly. She was born weighing approximately four pounds to first-time mother Nia, a 12-year-old chimpanzee. Pace Frank, lead primate caretaker at the Oklahoma City Zoo, said: "It was quickly apparent that Nia was not adapting to motherhood appropriately and we made the difficult decision to remove and hand-rear the baby while searching for a suitable home with a nurturing surrogate.? The Chimp Forest Animal Care team who work in three shifts day and night to provide her constant care. ?Maisie drinks baby formula every three hours, sleeps, and has some playtime every day to help strengthen her muscles,?Pam Carter said. ?We also wear a shirt and blanket that have fringe material sewn on that helps her learn to grip.? Maisie can now roll over by herself and she can also pull herself up into a sitting position, the zoo said. Chimpanzees are classified as endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List. ?Another reason we give recognizable names to animals in our care is that it helps create a unique bond between the animal and our visitors,? said Margaret Rose-Innes, assistant general curator. ?We hope that if they learn to care for the individual, they will also care about what we are doing to save that species, which is so important not just for our future generations, but also for the future of Maisie?s wild cousins.? Maisie brings the Maryland Zoo?s chimpanzee troop up to fifteen, which includes one-year-old Lola and ten-month-old Violet. Please credit Courtesy of Maryland Zoo / MEGA. 12 Nov 2020 Pictured: Baby chimp Maisie at Maryland Zoo. Photo credit: Courtesy of Maryland Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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A US zoo is celebrating - after finally choosing a name for its newest baby chimp. Staff at Maryland Zoo called on fans to help name the latest addition to their chimpanzee troop. And after more than 9500 votes were cast, the winner was announced - Maisie. The name beat out runners-up including Asha, Olivia, Nyota and Tulia. The names in the contest were selected by the Chimpanzee Forest animal care team members, who have been caring for the littlest chimp around the clock at the Baltimore facility. ?We?re so happy she officially has a name,? said Pam Carter, Chimpanzee Forest area manager. ?Animal care staff use individual names, especially during training sessions. The chimpanzees all recognize their own names as well as each other?s and being able to call her Maisie will help us make the important introductions to the troop when she is ready.? Maisie arrived at the zoo in late September. She was born at the Oklahoma City Zoo on August 28. But she was moved to be hand-reared and paired with a surrogate chimp mother after her birth mother was unable to care for her properly. She was born weighing approximately four pounds to first-time mother Nia, a 12-year-old chimpanzee. Pace Frank, lead primate caretaker at the Oklahoma City Zoo, said: "It was quickly apparent that Nia was not adapting to motherhood appropriately and we made the difficult decision to remove and hand-rear the baby while searching for a suitable home with a nurturing surrogate.? The Chimp Forest Animal Care team who work in three shifts day and night to provide her constant care. ?Maisie drinks baby formula every three hours, sleeps, and has some playtime every day to help strengthen her muscles,?Pam Carter said. ?We also wear a shirt and blanket that have fringe material sewn on that helps her learn to grip.? Maisie can now roll over by herself and she can also pull herself up into a sitting position, the zoo said. Chimpanzees are classified as endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List. ?Another reason we give recognizable names to animals in our care is that it helps create a unique bond between the animal and our visitors,? said Margaret Rose-Innes, assistant general curator. ?We hope that if they learn to care for the individual, they will also care about what we are doing to save that species, which is so important not just for our future generations, but also for the future of Maisie?s wild cousins.? Maisie brings the Maryland Zoo?s chimpanzee troop up to fifteen, which includes one-year-old Lola and ten-month-old Violet. Please credit Courtesy of Maryland Zoo / MEGA. 12 Nov 2020 Pictured: Baby chimp Maisie at Maryland Zoo. Photo credit: Courtesy of Maryland Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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A US zoo is celebrating - after finally choosing a name for its newest baby chimp. Staff at Maryland Zoo called on fans to help name the latest addition to their chimpanzee troop. And after more than 9500 votes were cast, the winner was announced - Maisie. The name beat out runners-up including Asha, Olivia, Nyota and Tulia. The names in the contest were selected by the Chimpanzee Forest animal care team members, who have been caring for the littlest chimp around the clock at the Baltimore facility. ?We?re so happy she officially has a name,? said Pam Carter, Chimpanzee Forest area manager. ?Animal care staff use individual names, especially during training sessions. The chimpanzees all recognize their own names as well as each other?s and being able to call her Maisie will help us make the important introductions to the troop when she is ready.? Maisie arrived at the zoo in late September. She was born at the Oklahoma City Zoo on August 28. But she was moved to be hand-reared and paired with a surrogate chimp mother after her birth mother was unable to care for her properly. She was born weighing approximately four pounds to first-time mother Nia, a 12-year-old chimpanzee. Pace Frank, lead primate caretaker at the Oklahoma City Zoo, said: "It was quickly apparent that Nia was not adapting to motherhood appropriately and we made the difficult decision to remove and hand-rear the baby while searching for a suitable home with a nurturing surrogate.? The Chimp Forest Animal Care team who work in three shifts day and night to provide her constant care. ?Maisie drinks baby formula every three hours, sleeps, and has some playtime every day to help strengthen her muscles,?Pam Carter said. ?We also wear a shirt and blanket that have fringe material sewn on that helps her learn to grip.? Maisie can now roll over by herself and she can also pull herself up into a sitting position, the zoo said. Chimpanzees are classified as endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List. ?Another reason we give recognizable names to animals in our care is that it helps create a unique bond between the animal and our visitors,? said Margaret Rose-Innes, assistant general curator. ?We hope that if they learn to care for the individual, they will also care about what we are doing to save that species, which is so important not just for our future generations, but also for the future of Maisie?s wild cousins.? Maisie brings the Maryland Zoo?s chimpanzee troop up to fifteen, which includes one-year-old Lola and ten-month-old Violet. Please credit Courtesy of Maryland Zoo / MEGA. 12 Nov 2020 Pictured: Baby chimp Maisie at Maryland Zoo - getting weighed. Photo credit: Courtesy of Maryland Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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A US zoo is celebrating - after finally choosing a name for its newest baby chimp. Staff at Maryland Zoo called on fans to help name the latest addition to their chimpanzee troop. And after more than 9500 votes were cast, the winner was announced - Maisie. The name beat out runners-up including Asha, Olivia, Nyota and Tulia. The names in the contest were selected by the Chimpanzee Forest animal care team members, who have been caring for the littlest chimp around the clock at the Baltimore facility. ?We?re so happy she officially has a name,? said Pam Carter, Chimpanzee Forest area manager. ?Animal care staff use individual names, especially during training sessions. The chimpanzees all recognize their own names as well as each other?s and being able to call her Maisie will help us make the important introductions to the troop when she is ready.? Maisie arrived at the zoo in late September. She was born at the Oklahoma City Zoo on August 28. But she was moved to be hand-reared and paired with a surrogate chimp mother after her birth mother was unable to care for her properly. She was born weighing approximately four pounds to first-time mother Nia, a 12-year-old chimpanzee. Pace Frank, lead primate caretaker at the Oklahoma City Zoo, said: "It was quickly apparent that Nia was not adapting to motherhood appropriately and we made the difficult decision to remove and hand-rear the baby while searching for a suitable home with a nurturing surrogate.? The Chimp Forest Animal Care team who work in three shifts day and night to provide her constant care. ?Maisie drinks baby formula every three hours, sleeps, and has some playtime every day to help strengthen her muscles,?Pam Carter said. ?We also wear a shirt and blanket that have fringe material sewn on that helps her learn to grip.? Maisie can now roll over by herself and she can also pull herself up into a sitting position, the zoo said. Chimpanzees are classified as endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List. ?Another reason we give recognizable names to animals in our care is that it helps create a unique bond between the animal and our visitors,? said Margaret Rose-Innes, assistant general curator. ?We hope that if they learn to care for the individual, they will also care about what we are doing to save that species, which is so important not just for our future generations, but also for the future of Maisie?s wild cousins.? Maisie brings the Maryland Zoo?s chimpanzee troop up to fifteen, which includes one-year-old Lola and ten-month-old Violet. Please credit Courtesy of Maryland Zoo / MEGA. 12 Nov 2020 Pictured: Baby chimp Maisie at Maryland Zoo. Photo credit: Courtesy of Maryland Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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A US zoo is celebrating - after finally choosing a name for its newest baby chimp. Staff at Maryland Zoo called on fans to help name the latest addition to their chimpanzee troop. And after more than 9500 votes were cast, the winner was announced - Maisie. The name beat out runners-up including Asha, Olivia, Nyota and Tulia. The names in the contest were selected by the Chimpanzee Forest animal care team members, who have been caring for the littlest chimp around the clock at the Baltimore facility. ?We?re so happy she officially has a name,? said Pam Carter, Chimpanzee Forest area manager. ?Animal care staff use individual names, especially during training sessions. The chimpanzees all recognize their own names as well as each other?s and being able to call her Maisie will help us make the important introductions to the troop when she is ready.? Maisie arrived at the zoo in late September. She was born at the Oklahoma City Zoo on August 28. But she was moved to be hand-reared and paired with a surrogate chimp mother after her birth mother was unable to care for her properly. She was born weighing approximately four pounds to first-time mother Nia, a 12-year-old chimpanzee. Pace Frank, lead primate caretaker at the Oklahoma City Zoo, said: "It was quickly apparent that Nia was not adapting to motherhood appropriately and we made the difficult decision to remove and hand-rear the baby while searching for a suitable home with a nurturing surrogate.? The Chimp Forest Animal Care team who work in three shifts day and night to provide her constant care. ?Maisie drinks baby formula every three hours, sleeps, and has some playtime every day to help strengthen her muscles,?Pam Carter said. ?We also wear a shirt and blanket that have fringe material sewn on that helps her learn to grip.? Maisie can now roll over by herself and she can also pull herself up into a sitting position, the zoo said. Chimpanzees are classified as endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List. ?Another reason we give recognizable names to animals in our care is that it helps create a unique bond between the animal and our visitors,? said Margaret Rose-Innes, assistant general curator. ?We hope that if they learn to care for the individual, they will also care about what we are doing to save that species, which is so important not just for our future generations, but also for the future of Maisie?s wild cousins.? Maisie brings the Maryland Zoo?s chimpanzee troop up to fifteen, which includes one-year-old Lola and ten-month-old Violet. Please credit Courtesy of Maryland Zoo / MEGA. 12 Nov 2020 Pictured: Baby chimp Maisie at Maryland Zoo. Photo credit: Courtesy of Maryland Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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A US zoo is celebrating - after finally choosing a name for its newest baby chimp. Staff at Maryland Zoo called on fans to help name the latest addition to their chimpanzee troop. And after more than 9500 votes were cast, the winner was announced - Maisie. The name beat out runners-up including Asha, Olivia, Nyota and Tulia. The names in the contest were selected by the Chimpanzee Forest animal care team members, who have been caring for the littlest chimp around the clock at the Baltimore facility. ?We?re so happy she officially has a name,? said Pam Carter, Chimpanzee Forest area manager. ?Animal care staff use individual names, especially during training sessions. The chimpanzees all recognize their own names as well as each other?s and being able to call her Maisie will help us make the important introductions to the troop when she is ready.? Maisie arrived at the zoo in late September. She was born at the Oklahoma City Zoo on August 28. But she was moved to be hand-reared and paired with a surrogate chimp mother after her birth mother was unable to care for her properly. She was born weighing approximately four pounds to first-time mother Nia, a 12-year-old chimpanzee. Pace Frank, lead primate caretaker at the Oklahoma City Zoo, said: "It was quickly apparent that Nia was not adapting to motherhood appropriately and we made the difficult decision to remove and hand-rear the baby while searching for a suitable home with a nurturing surrogate.? The Chimp Forest Animal Care team who work in three shifts day and night to provide her constant care. ?Maisie drinks baby formula every three hours, sleeps, and has some playtime every day to help strengthen her muscles,?Pam Carter said. ?We also wear a shirt and blanket that have fringe material sewn on that helps her learn to grip.? Maisie can now roll over by herself and she can also pull herself up into a sitting position, the zoo said. Chimpanzees are classified as endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List. ?Another reason we give recognizable names to animals in our care is that it helps create a unique bond between the animal and our visitors,? said Margaret Rose-Innes, assistant general curator. ?We hope that if they learn to care for the individual, they will also care about what we are doing to save that species, which is so important not just for our future generations, but also for the future of Maisie?s wild cousins.? Maisie brings the Maryland Zoo?s chimpanzee troop up to fifteen, which includes one-year-old Lola and ten-month-old Violet. Please credit Courtesy of Maryland Zoo / MEGA. 12 Nov 2020 Pictured: Baby chimp Maisie at Maryland Zoo. Photo credit: Courtesy of Maryland Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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A US zoo is celebrating - after finally choosing a name for its newest baby chimp. Staff at Maryland Zoo called on fans to help name the latest addition to their chimpanzee troop. And after more than 9500 votes were cast, the winner was announced - Maisie. The name beat out runners-up including Asha, Olivia, Nyota and Tulia. The names in the contest were selected by the Chimpanzee Forest animal care team members, who have been caring for the littlest chimp around the clock at the Baltimore facility. ?We?re so happy she officially has a name,? said Pam Carter, Chimpanzee Forest area manager. ?Animal care staff use individual names, especially during training sessions. The chimpanzees all recognize their own names as well as each other?s and being able to call her Maisie will help us make the important introductions to the troop when she is ready.? Maisie arrived at the zoo in late September. She was born at the Oklahoma City Zoo on August 28. But she was moved to be hand-reared and paired with a surrogate chimp mother after her birth mother was unable to care for her properly. She was born weighing approximately four pounds to first-time mother Nia, a 12-year-old chimpanzee. Pace Frank, lead primate caretaker at the Oklahoma City Zoo, said: "It was quickly apparent that Nia was not adapting to motherhood appropriately and we made the difficult decision to remove and hand-rear the baby while searching for a suitable home with a nurturing surrogate.? The Chimp Forest Animal Care team who work in three shifts day and night to provide her constant care. ?Maisie drinks baby formula every three hours, sleeps, and has some playtime every day to help strengthen her muscles,?Pam Carter said. ?We also wear a shirt and blanket that have fringe material sewn on that helps her learn to grip.? Maisie can now roll over by herself and she can also pull herself up into a sitting position, the zoo said. Chimpanzees are classified as endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List. ?Another reason we give recognizable names to animals in our care is that it helps create a unique bond between the animal and our visitors,? said Margaret Rose-Innes, assistant general curator. ?We hope that if they learn to care for the individual, they will also care about what we are doing to save that species, which is so important not just for our future generations, but also for the future of Maisie?s wild cousins.? Maisie brings the Maryland Zoo?s chimpanzee troop up to fifteen, which includes one-year-old Lola and ten-month-old Violet. Please credit Courtesy of Maryland Zoo / MEGA. 12 Nov 2020 Pictured: Baby chimp Maisie at Maryland Zoo. Photo credit: Courtesy of Maryland Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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A US zoo is celebrating - after finally choosing a name for its newest baby chimp. Staff at Maryland Zoo called on fans to help name the latest addition to their chimpanzee troop. And after more than 9500 votes were cast, the winner was announced - Maisie. The name beat out runners-up including Asha, Olivia, Nyota and Tulia. The names in the contest were selected by the Chimpanzee Forest animal care team members, who have been caring for the littlest chimp around the clock at the Baltimore facility. ?We?re so happy she officially has a name,? said Pam Carter, Chimpanzee Forest area manager. ?Animal care staff use individual names, especially during training sessions. The chimpanzees all recognize their own names as well as each other?s and being able to call her Maisie will help us make the important introductions to the troop when she is ready.? Maisie arrived at the zoo in late September. She was born at the Oklahoma City Zoo on August 28. But she was moved to be hand-reared and paired with a surrogate chimp mother after her birth mother was unable to care for her properly. She was born weighing approximately four pounds to first-time mother Nia, a 12-year-old chimpanzee. Pace Frank, lead primate caretaker at the Oklahoma City Zoo, said: "It was quickly apparent that Nia was not adapting to motherhood appropriately and we made the difficult decision to remove and hand-rear the baby while searching for a suitable home with a nurturing surrogate.? The Chimp Forest Animal Care team who work in three shifts day and night to provide her constant care. ?Maisie drinks baby formula every three hours, sleeps, and has some playtime every day to help strengthen her muscles,?Pam Carter said. ?We also wear a shirt and blanket that have fringe material sewn on that helps her learn to grip.? Maisie can now roll over by herself and she can also pull herself up into a sitting position, the zoo said. Chimpanzees are classified as endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List. ?Another reason we give recognizable names to animals in our care is that it helps create a unique bond between the animal and our visitors,? said Margaret Rose-Innes, assistant general curator. ?We hope that if they learn to care for the individual, they will also care about what we are doing to save that species, which is so important not just for our future generations, but also for the future of Maisie?s wild cousins.? Maisie brings the Maryland Zoo?s chimpanzee troop up to fifteen, which includes one-year-old Lola and ten-month-old Violet. Please credit Courtesy of Maryland Zoo / MEGA. 12 Nov 2020 Pictured: Baby chimp Maisie at Maryland Zoo. Photo credit: Courtesy of Maryland Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
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A US zoo is celebrating - after finally choosing a name for its newest baby chimp. Staff at Maryland Zoo called on fans to help name the latest addition to their chimpanzee troop. And after more than 9500 votes were cast, the winner was announced - Maisie. The name beat out runners-up including Asha, Olivia, Nyota and Tulia. The names in the contest were selected by the Chimpanzee Forest animal care team members, who have been caring for the littlest chimp around the clock at the Baltimore facility. ?We?re so happy she officially has a name,? said Pam Carter, Chimpanzee Forest area manager. ?Animal care staff use individual names, especially during training sessions. The chimpanzees all recognize their own names as well as each other?s and being able to call her Maisie will help us make the important introductions to the troop when she is ready.? Maisie arrived at the zoo in late September. She was born at the Oklahoma City Zoo on August 28. But she was moved to be hand-reared and paired with a surrogate chimp mother after her birth mother was unable to care for her properly. She was born weighing approximately four pounds to first-time mother Nia, a 12-year-old chimpanzee. Pace Frank, lead primate caretaker at the Oklahoma City Zoo, said: "It was quickly apparent that Nia was not adapting to motherhood appropriately and we made the difficult decision to remove and hand-rear the baby while searching for a suitable home with a nurturing surrogate.? The Chimp Forest Animal Care team who work in three shifts day and night to provide her constant care. ?Maisie drinks baby formula every three hours, sleeps, and has some playtime every day to help strengthen her muscles,?Pam Carter said. ?We also wear a shirt and blanket that have fringe material sewn on that helps her learn to grip.? Maisie can now roll over by herself and she can also pull herself up into a sitting position, the zoo said. Chimpanzees are classified as endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List. ?Another reason we give recognizable names to animals in our care is that it helps create a unique bond between the animal and our visitors,? said Margaret Rose-Innes, assistant general curator. ?We hope that if they learn to care for the individual, they will also care about what we are doing to save that species, which is so important not just for our future generations, but also for the future of Maisie?s wild cousins.? Maisie brings the Maryland Zoo?s chimpanzee troop up to fifteen, which includes one-year-old Lola and ten-month-old Violet. Please credit Courtesy of Maryland Zoo / MEGA. 12 Nov 2020 Pictured: Baby chimp Maisie at Maryland Zoo. Photo credit: Courtesy of Maryland Zoo/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights

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