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Нобелевская премия 2020 по физике присуждена Роджеру Пенроузу, Рейнхарду Гензель и Андреа Гезу за исследования черных дыр (91)

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TOPSHOT - German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel (R) stands among members of his team at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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(201006) -- STOCKHOLM, Oct. 6, 2020 (Xinhua) -- Photo taken on Oct. 6, 2020 shows the announcement of the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics in Stockholm, Sweden. Three scientists shared the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics for their discoveries about the black hole, one of the most exotic phenomena in the universe, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm announced on Tuesday. (Photo by Wei Xuechao/Xinhua)
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(201006) -- STOCKHOLM, Oct. 6, 2020 (Xinhua) -- Ulf Danielsson, a member of the Nobel Committee for Physics, explains the achievements of the 2020 Nobel laureates in Physics during the prize announcement at the Royal Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on Oct. 6, 2020. Three scientists shared the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics for their discoveries about the black hole, one of the most exotic phenomena in the universe, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm announced on Tuesday. (Photo by Wei Xuechao/Xinhua)
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(201007) -- BEIJING, Oct. 7, 2020 (Xinhua) -- Photo taken on Oct. 6, 2020 shows the announcement of the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics in Stockholm, Sweden. Three scientists shared the Nobel Prize in Physics 2020 for their discoveries about the black hole, one of the most exotic phenomena in the universe, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm announced on Tuesday. (Photo by Wei Xuechao/Xinhua)
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David Haviland, member of the Nobel Committee for Physics, left, and Goran K. Hansson, Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences, announce the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Tuesday Oct. 6, 2020. The three winners on the screen from left, Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez have won this year???s Nobel Prize in physics for black hole discoveries. (Fredrik Sandberg/TT via AP)
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Goran K. Hansson, Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences, center, with David Haviland, left, and Ulf Danielsson, member of the Nobel Committee for Physics, announce the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Tuesday Oct. 6, 2020. The three winners on the screen from left, Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez have won this year???s Nobel Prize in physics for black hole discoveries. (Fredrik Sandberg/TT via AP)
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Goran K. Hansson, Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences, center, announces the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Tuesday Oct. 6, 2020. The three winners on the screen from left, Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez have won this year???s Nobel Prize in physics for black hole discoveries. (Fredrik Sandberg/TT via AP)
SWEDEN OUT
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Ulf Danielsson, member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences speaks after the announcement of the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Tuesday Oct. 6, 2020. The three winners on the screen from left, Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez have won this year???s Nobel Prize in physics for black hole discoveries. (Fredrik Sandberg/TT via AP)
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Ulf Danielsson, member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences speaks after the announcement of the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Tuesday Oct. 6, 2020. The three winners on the screen from left, Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez have won this year???s Nobel Prize in physics for black hole discoveries. (Fredrik Sandberg/TT via AP)
SWEDEN OUT
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Journalists wearing protective face masks attend the news conference announcing the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Tuesday Oct. 6, 2020. The three winners Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez have won this year???s Nobel Prize in physics for black hole discoveries. (Fredrik Sandberg/TT via AP)
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Reinhard Genzel, right, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, celebrates his Nobel Prize in Physics with his team in Garching, Germany, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020. (Matthias Balk/dpa via AP)
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Reinhard Genzel, right, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, celebrates his Nobel Prize in Physics with his team in Garching, Germany, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020. (Matthias Balk/dpa via AP)
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Andrea Ghez, professor of physics and astronomy at UCLA, poses during an interview at the university in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020. Ghez was one of three scientists who was awarded this year's Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for advancing our understanding of black holes, the all-consuming monsters that lurk in the darkest parts of the universe. (AP Photo/Aron Ranen)
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Roger Penrose poses for a photographer in Oxford, England, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020. Three scientists Briton Roger Penrose, German Reinhard Genzel and American Andrea Ghez won the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for advancing our understanding of black holes, the all-consuming monsters that lurk in the darkest parts of the universe and still confound astronomers.(AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
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Roger Penrose poses for a photographer in Oxford, England, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020. Three scientists Briton Roger Penrose, German Reinhard Genzel and American Andrea Ghez won the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for advancing our understanding of black holes, the all-consuming monsters that lurk in the darkest parts of the universe and still confound astronomers.(AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
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Roger Penrose poses for a photographer in Oxford, England, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020. Three scientists Briton Roger Penrose, German Reinhard Genzel and American Andrea Ghez won the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for advancing our understanding of black holes, the all-consuming monsters that lurk in the darkest parts of the universe and still confound astronomers.(AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
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Roger Penrose poses for a photographer in Oxford, England, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020. Three scientists Briton Roger Penrose, German Reinhard Genzel and American Andrea Ghez won the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for advancing our understanding of black holes, the all-consuming monsters that lurk in the darkest parts of the universe and still confound astronomers.(AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
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Roger Penrose poses for a photographer in Oxford, England, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020. Three scientists Briton Roger Penrose, German Reinhard Genzel and American Andrea Ghez won the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for advancing our understanding of black holes, the all-consuming monsters that lurk in the darkest parts of the universe and still confound astronomers.(AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
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Roger Penrose poses for a photographer in Oxford, England, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020. Three scientists Briton Roger Penrose, German Reinhard Genzel and American Andrea Ghez won the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for advancing our understanding of black holes, the all-consuming monsters that lurk in the darkest parts of the universe and still confound astronomers.(AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
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Roger Penrose, after he heard the news that he was a Nobel Prize winner at his home in Oxford, UK on October 6, 2020, in an image released to the media by the University of Oxford. Roger Penrose is one of the winners of the The Nobel Prize in Physics 2020 for his work on the discovery of better understanding the universe and black holes. (Photo by Dyrol Lumbard/University of Oxford via Sipa USA) **EDITORIAL USE ONLY**?
**EDITORIAL USE ONLY**?
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Andrea Ghez seen here in an image released to the media by University of California, Los Angeles is one of the winners of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2020 for her work on the discovery of better understanding the universe and black holes. Andrea Ghez is a UCLA's Lauren B. Leichtman and Arthur E. Levine Professor of Astrophysics. (Photo by Christopher Dibble/University of California Los Angeles via Sipa USA) **EDITORIAL USE ONLY**?
EDITORIAL USE ONLY
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Andrea Ghez seen here in an image released to the media by University of California, Los Angeles is one of the winners of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2020 for her work on the discovery of better understanding the universe and black holes. Andrea Ghez is a UCLA's Lauren B. Leichtman and Arthur E. Levine Professor of Astrophysics. (Photo by Christopher Dibble/University of California Los Angeles via Sipa USA) **EDITORIAL USE ONLY**?
EDITORIAL USE ONLY
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Andrea Ghez seen here in an image released to the media by University of California, Los Angeles is one of the winners of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2020 for her work on the discovery of better understanding the universe and black holes. Andrea Ghez is a UCLA's Lauren B. Leichtman and Arthur E. Levine Professor of Astrophysics. (Photo by Elena Zhukova/University of California Los Angeles via Sipa USA)** **EDITORIAL USE ONLY**?
EDITORIAL USE ONLY
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Goran K Hansson (L), Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences, listens as Ulf Danielsson (R), member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, speaks during the announcement of the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2020. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Fredrik SANDBERG / TT News Agency / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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David Haviland (L), member of the Nobel Committee for Physics, and Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences, (L-R) sit in front of a screen displaying the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics (L-R) Briton Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, on October 6, 2020. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize on Tuesday for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Fredrik SANDBERG / TT NEWS AGENCY / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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Ulf Danielsson, member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, speaks during the announcement of the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2020. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Fredrik SANDBERG / TT News Agency / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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Ulf Danielsson, member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, speaks during the announcement of the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2020. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Fredrik SANDBERG / TT News Agency / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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Ulf Danielsson (C), member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, speaks during the announcement of the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2020. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Fredrik SANDBERG / TT News Agency / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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Ulf Danielsson, member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, is pictured during the announcement of the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2020. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Fredrik SANDBERG / TT News Agency / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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David Haviland (L), member of the Nobel Committee for Physics, and Goran K Hansson (C), Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences, listen as Ulf Danielsson (R), member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, speaks during the announcement of the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2020. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Fredrik SANDBERG / TT News Agency / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences, announces the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 6, 2020. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Fredrik SANDBERG / TT News Agency / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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David Haviland (L), member of the Nobel Committee for Physics, Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences, and Ulf Danielsson, member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences sit in front of a screen displaying the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics (L-R) Briton Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, on October 6, 2020. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize on Tuesday for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Fredrik SANDBERG / TT News Agency / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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David Haviland, member of the Nobel Committee for Physics, speaks during the announcement of the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, on October 6, 2020. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize on Tuesday for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Fredrik SANDBERG / TT News Agency / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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(Back L-R) David Haviland, member of the Nobel Committee for Physics, Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences, and Ulf Danielsson, member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, announce the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, on October 6, 2020. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize on Tuesday for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Fredrik SANDBERG / TT News Agency / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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Journalists wearing protective face masks attend a news conference announing the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physic at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, on October 6, 2020. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize on Tuesday for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Fredrik SANDBERG / TT News Agency / AFP) / Sweden OUT
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel (R) stands among members of his team at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel (R) stands among members of his team at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel is pictured at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Christof STACHE / AFP)
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This undated handout photo released on October 6, 2020 courtesy of UCLA and Elena Zhukova shows Andrea Ghez, UCLA's Lauren B. Leichtman and Arthur E. Levine Professor of Astrophysics, who has been awarded the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize on October 6, 2020 for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said.The physicists were selected "for their discoveries about one of the most exotic phenomena in the universe, the black hole," the Nobel Committee said. Penrose, 89, was honoured for showing "that the general theory of relativity leads to the formation of black holes", while Genzel, 68, and Ghez, 55, were jointly awarded for discovering "that an invisible and extremely heavy object governs the orbits of stars at the centre of our galaxy," the jury said. (Photo by Elena Zhukova / University of California, Los Angeles / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /UCLA/ELENA ZHUKOVA/HANDOUT " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /UCLA/ELENA ZHUKOVA/HANDOUT " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel is pictured at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Christof STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel is pictured at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Christof STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel (3rd L) stands among members of his team at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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David Haviland (L), member of the Nobel Committee for Physics, and Goran K Hansson, Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences, sit in front of a screen displaying the winners of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics (L-R) Briton Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, on October 6, 2020. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize on Tuesday for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Fredrik SANDBERG / TT NEWS AGENCY / AFP) / Sweden OUT
ALTERNATIVE CROP - / Sweden OUT
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel is pictured at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel (3rd L) reacts among members of his team at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel (C) reacts among members of his team at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel (C) reacts at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel (R) reacts among members of his team at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel is pictured at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Christof STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel is pictured at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Christof STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel is pictured at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Christof STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel (R) reacts among members of his team at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel is pictured at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Christof STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel is pictured at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel is pictured at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel is pictured at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel is pictured at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel is pictured at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel (R) reacts among members of his team at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel is pictured at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel is pictured at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE / AFP)
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A handout picture released by Oxford University shows Roger Penrose posing on October 6, 2020 in Oxford after winning the Nobel Physics Prize. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize today for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Handout / Oxford University / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /OXFORD UNIVERSITY " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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A handout picture released by Oxford University shows Roger Penrose posing on October 6, 2020 in Oxford after winning the Nobel Physics Prize. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize today for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. (Photo by Handout / Oxford University / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /OXFORD UNIVERSITY " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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(COMBO) This combination of pictures created on October 06, 2020 showing (L-R) a handout picture released by Oxford University shows Roger Penrose posing on October 6, 2020 in Oxford after winning the Nobel Physics Prize, an undated handout photo released on October 6, 2020 courtesy of UCLA and Elena Zhukova shows professor Andrea Ghez of the US and German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics on October 6, 2020 in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize October 6, 2020 for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. Penrose, 89, was honoured for showing "that the general theory of relativity leads to the formation of black holes", while Genzel, 68, and Ghez, 55, were jointly awarded for discovering "that an invisible and extremely heavy object governs the orbits of stars at the centre of our galaxy," the jury said. (Photos by various sources / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /OXFORD UNIVERSITY " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /UCLA/ELENA ZHUKOVA/HANDOUT " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS /
SEE CAPTION FOR MORE INFORMATION / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /OXFORD UNIVERSITY " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /UC
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This undated handout image released by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) on October 6, 2020 shows German Professor Reinhard Genzel posing at the Paranal Observatory in Paranal, some 1150 km north of Santiago, Chile. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize October 6, 2020 for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. Penrose, 89, was honoured for showing "that the general theory of relativity leads to the formation of black holes", while Genzel, 68, and Ghez, 55, were jointly awarded for discovering "that an invisible and extremely heavy object governs the orbits of stars at the centre of our galaxy," the jury said. (Photo by - / European Southern Observatory / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUROPEAN SOUTHERN OBSERVATORY (ESO)" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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Andrea Ghez, UCLA professor and winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics, is seen on a video grab Zoom conference call with the news media on October 6, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize on October 6, 2020 for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. Penrose, 89, was honoured for showing "that the general theory of relativity leads to the formation of black holes", while Genzel, 68, and Ghez, 55, were jointly awarded for discovering "that an invisible and extremely heavy object governs the orbits of stars at the centre of our galaxy," the jury said. Andrea Ghez is just the fourth woman to receive the physics prize since 1901 when the first Nobel prizes were handed out. (Photo by Frederic J. BROWN / AFP)
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Andrea Ghez, UCLA professor and winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics, is seen on a video grab Zoom conference call with the news media on October 6, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize on October 6, 2020 for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. Penrose, 89, was honoured for showing "that the general theory of relativity leads to the formation of black holes", while Genzel, 68, and Ghez, 55, were jointly awarded for discovering "that an invisible and extremely heavy object governs the orbits of stars at the centre of our galaxy," the jury said. Andrea Ghez is just the fourth woman to receive the physics prize since 1901 when the first Nobel prizes were handed out. (Photo by Frederic J. BROWN / AFP)
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(COMBO) This combination of pictures created on October 06, 2020 shows (L-R) a handout picture released by Oxford University shows Roger Penrose posing on October 6, 2020 in Oxford after winning the Nobel Physics Prize, German astrophysicist Reinhard Genzel at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics on October 6, 2020 in Garching near Munich, southern Germany, after he was named co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics, and an undated handout photo obtained on October 6, 2020 from the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shows US astronomer and professor Andrea Ghez. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize October 6, 2020 for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. Penrose, 89, was honoured for showing "that the general theory of relativity leads to the formation of black holes", while Genzel, 68, and Ghez, 55, were jointly awarded for discovering "that an invisible and extremely heavy object governs the orbits of stars at the centre of our galaxy," the jury said. (Photos by various sources / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /OXFORD UNIVERSITY " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / UCLA /Christopher Dibble " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS /
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dpatop - 06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, stands behind the microphones after a press conference at the institute, while the visitors of the press conference applaud him. Genzel was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, makes a statement to the press following a press conference at the institute. Genzel was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, makes a statement to the press following a press conference at the institute. Genzel was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (l), is standing next to Martin Stratmann, President of the Max Planck Society, after a press conference at the institute, while the visitors of the press conference applaud him. Genzel was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, gives a press conference at the institute. Genzel was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, stands behind the microphones after a press conference at the institute, while the visitors of the press conference applaud him. Genzel was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, celebrates his Nobel Prize in Physics with his team. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, celebrates his Nobel Prize in Physics with his team. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, celebrates his Nobel Prize in Physics with his team. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (l), celebrates his Nobel Prize in Physics with his team and toasts with Martin Stratmann, President of the Max Planck Society. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel (r), astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, celebrates his Nobel Prize in Physics with his team. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel (r), astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, celebrates his Nobel Prize in Physics with his team. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, celebrates his Nobel Prize in Physics. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, celebrates his Nobel Prize in Physics. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel (2nd from right), astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, celebrates his Nobel Prize in Physics with his team. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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dpatop - 06 October 2020, Bavaria, Garching: Reinhard Genzel, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, celebrates his Nobel Prize in Physics. Photo: Matthias Balk/dpa
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Reinhard Genzel, right, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, celebrates his Nobel Prize in Physics with his team in Garching, Germany, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020. (Matthias Balk/dpa via AP), APTOPIX
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Reinhard Genzel, right, astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, celebrates his Nobel Prize in Physics with his team in Garching, Germany, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020. (Matthias Balk/dpa via AP)
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This handout image released by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) on October 6, 2020 shows shows the orbits of stars very close to the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way. One of these stars, named S2, orbits every 16 years and is passing very close to the black hole in May 2018. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize October 6, 2020 for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. Penrose, 89, was honoured for showing "that the general theory of relativity leads to the formation of black holes", while Genzel, 68, and Ghez, 55, were jointly awarded for discovering "that an invisible and extremely heavy object governs the orbits of stars at the centre of our galaxy," the jury said. (Photo by - / European Southern Observatory / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUROPEAN SOUTHERN OBSERVATORY (ESO)" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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This undated handout photo obtained on October 6, 2020 from the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shows US astronomer and professor Andrea Ghez. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize on October 6, 2020 for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. Penrose, 89, was honoured for showing "that the general theory of relativity leads to the formation of black holes", while Genzel, 68, and Ghez, 55, were jointly awarded for discovering "that an invisible and extremely heavy object governs the orbits of stars at the centre of our galaxy," the jury said. Andrea Ghez is just the fourth woman to receive the physics prize since 1901 when the first Nobel prizes were handed out. (Photo by Christopher DIBBLE / UCLA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / UCLA /Christopher Dibble " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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This undated handout photo obtained on October 6, 2020 from the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shows US astronomer and professor Andrea Ghez. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize on October 6, 2020 for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. Penrose, 89, was honoured for showing "that the general theory of relativity leads to the formation of black holes", while Genzel, 68, and Ghez, 55, were jointly awarded for discovering "that an invisible and extremely heavy object governs the orbits of stars at the centre of our galaxy," the jury said. Andrea Ghez is just the fourth woman to receive the physics prize since 1901 when the first Nobel prizes were handed out. (Photo by Christopher Dibble / UCLA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / UCLA /Christopher Dibble " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / UCLA /Christopher Dibble " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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This undated handout photo obtained on October 6, 2020 from the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shows US astronomer and professor Andrea Ghez. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize on October 6, 2020 for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. Penrose, 89, was honoured for showing "that the general theory of relativity leads to the formation of black holes", while Genzel, 68, and Ghez, 55, were jointly awarded for discovering "that an invisible and extremely heavy object governs the orbits of stars at the centre of our galaxy," the jury said. Andrea Ghez is just the fourth woman to receive the physics prize since 1901 when the first Nobel prizes were handed out. (Photo by Christopher Dibble / University of California, Los Angeles / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / UCLA /Christopher Dibble " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
Editors note: Cropped version / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / UCLA /Christopher Dibble " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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This handout image released by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) on October 6, 2020 shows the central parts of our Galaxy, the Milky Way, as observed in the near-infrared with the NACO instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope. - Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the US won the Nobel Physics Prize October 6, 2020 for their research into black holes, the Nobel jury said. Penrose, 89, was honoured for showing "that the general theory of relativity leads to the formation of black holes", while Genzel, 68, and Ghez, 55, were jointly awarded for discovering "that an invisible and extremely heavy object governs the orbits of stars at the centre of our galaxy," the jury said. (Photo by - / European Southern Observatory / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUROPEAN SOUTHERN OBSERVATORY (ESO)" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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