Wednesday, April 24, 2019
close [x]
to:

Чернобыль - Sipa (17)

EN_01372475_0003
EN_01372475_0003
Though many statues of Vladimir Lenin have been torn down in Ukraine after the dissolution of the U.S.S.R., this 18-foot ode to the former Soviet leader still stands in the town of Chernobyl, much like many other Soviet remains in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0005
EN_01372475_0005
Children's toys are scattered throughout the grounds of villages that were abandoned after the explosion. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0006
EN_01372475_0006
Pripyat's iconic Ferris wheel in the amusement park that was set to open the week after the Chernobyl nuclear reactor exploded in 1986. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0009
EN_01372475_0009
One of two unfinished cooling towers that were slated for two more nuclear reactors that were under construction when reactor No. 4 exploded in April of 1986. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0010
EN_01372475_0010
Gas masks that were never used cover the floor in an elementary school in Pripyat. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0011
EN_01372475_0011
A hallway in an elementary school in Pripyat, where most of the buildings' windows were removed or looted in the wake of the nuclear disaster. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0013
EN_01372475_0013
One of the estimated 300 stray dogs in Chernobyl that are descendants of pets left behind by the evacuees. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0016
EN_01372475_0016
A doll left in the remains of an orphanage in an abandoned village in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0007
EN_01372475_0007
Ivan Ivanovich, 82, stands outside the home he built in Parishev, a village in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone that did not receive much radioactive contamination. Ivanovich was evacuated after the Chernobyl nuclear reactor exploded but returned the following year. He is one of 119 "self-settlers" who are still alive. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0008
EN_01372475_0008
Hidden in the forest near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant is the massive Duga-3 radar station, a roller coaster-looking contraption meant to detect U.S.-launched missiles targeting the U.S.S.R. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0014
EN_01372475_0014
As if someone were about to play a concerto, a decaying piano still stands in a store in the abandoned town of Pripyat. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0001
EN_01372475_0001
Standing in front of the new containment shield covering the remains of the exploded reactor are the writer, her husband and 11 students from Syracuse University. From left, Peter Levchuck, Weng Cheong, Zach Lang, Madelyn Urabe, Gilat Melamed, Raven Rentas, Taylor Lang, Malika Budur, writer Cheryl Reed, her husband Greg Stricharchuk (a former business editor at the Chicago Tribune), Dan Prager, Zach Krahmer and Elijah Shama. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0002
EN_01372475_0002
On the roof of a 16-story apartment building in Pripyat at sunset, a visitor can see what remains of the abandoned town. The only light comes from the Chernobyl nuclear station and the giant containment shield covering the remains of the exploded reactor. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0012
EN_01372475_0012
Baby shoes left at an abandoned orphanage in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0004
EN_01372475_0004
A rusting crib containing a baby doll and blanket sits in the Pripyat hospital maternity ward. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0015
EN_01372475_0015
The crumbling sarcophagus that covered the remains of the ill-fated reactor No. 4, seen here not long before the new containment shield was rolled over the structure in November 2016. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***
EN_01372475_0017
EN_01372475_0017
A child's doll in an abandoned orphanage in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. (Photo by Cheryl L. Reed/Chicago Tribune/TNS/Sipa USA)
*** World Rights *** US Newspapers Out ***

top