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Опубликована первая в истории фотография чёрной дыры (54)

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Mareki Honma (far R) of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan speaks at a press conference in Tokyo on April 10, 2019, to unveil the first-ever image of a black hole captured by an international team of scientists. (Kyodo via AP Images) ==Kyodo
EN_01371918_1404
EN_01371918_1404
Mareki Honma of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan speaks at a press conference in Tokyo on April 10, 2019, to unveil the first-ever image of a black hole captured by an international team of scientists. (Kyodo via AP Images) ==Kyodo
EN_01371918_1406
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Mareki Honma of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan speaks at a press conference in Tokyo on April 10, 2019, to unveil the first-ever image of a black hole captured by an international team of scientists. (Kyodo via AP Images) ==Kyodo
EN_01371918_1410
EN_01371918_1410
Mareki Honma of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan speaks at a press conference in Tokyo on April 10, 2019, to unveil the first-ever image of a black hole captured by an international team of scientists. (Kyodo via AP Images) ==Kyodo
EN_01371918_1411
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Mareki Honma of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan speaks at a press conference in Tokyo on April 10, 2019, to unveil the first-ever image of a black hole captured by an international team of scientists. (Kyodo via AP Images) ==Kyodo
EN_01371766_0180
EN_01371766_0180
(190410) -- SHANGHAI, April 10, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Photo provided by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) shows the first image of a black hole. (Xinhua/EHT)
EN_01371766_0183
EN_01371766_0183
(190410) -- SHANGHAI, April 10, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SAO) holds a press conference to release the first-ever image of a supermassive black hole at the heart of the distant galaxy M87, in east China's Shanghai, April 10, 2019. The image of the black hole, based on observations through the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration, was unveiled in coordinated press conferences across the globe at around 9:00 p.m. (Beijing time) on Wednesday. The landmark result offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the universe predicted by Albert Einstein's general relativity. (Xinhua/Fang Zhe)
EN_01371766_0184
EN_01371766_0184
(190410) -- SHANGHAI, April 10, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Shen Zhiqiang, head of Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SAO), presides over a press conference to release the first-ever image of a supermassive black hole at the heart of the distant galaxy M87, in east China's Shanghai, April 10, 2019. The image of the black hole, based on observations through the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration, was unveiled in coordinated press conferences across the globe at around 9:00 p.m. (Beijing time) on Wednesday. The landmark result offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the universe predicted by Albert Einstein's general relativity. (Xinhua/Fang Zhe)
EN_01371766_0185
EN_01371766_0185
(190410) -- SHANGHAI, April 10, 2019 (Xinhua) -- The first-ever image of a supermassive black hole at the heart of the distant galaxy M87 is released during a press conference held by Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SAO), in east China's Shanghai, April 10, 2019. The image of the black hole, based on observations through the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration, was unveiled in coordinated press conferences across the globe at around 9:00 p.m. (Beijing time) on Wednesday. The landmark result offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the universe predicted by Albert Einstein's general relativity. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)
EN_01371766_0239
EN_01371766_0239
(190410) -- BRUSSELS, April 10, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Photo taken on April 10, 2019 shows a press conference unveiling the first image of a black hole in Brussels, capital of Belgium. Astronomers said here Wednesday that they captured the first image of a black hole, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of an unseeable cosmic object and its shadow. (Xinhua/Zhang Cheng)
EN_01371766_0251
EN_01371766_0251
(190410) -- WASHINGTON, April 10, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Photo taken on April 10, 2019 shows a press conference held by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project and the National Science Foundation (NSF) on EHT result in Washington D.C., the United States. Astronomers said here Wednesday that they captured the first image of a black hole, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of an unseeable cosmic object and its shadow. (Xinhua/Liu Jie)
EN_01371766_0292
EN_01371766_0292
(190410) -- SHANGHAI, April 10, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Chinese researchers discuss the imaging methods of the image of a black hole in Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SAO), in east China's Shanghai, April 9, 2019. The image of the black hole, based on observations through the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration, was unveiled in coordinated press conferences across the globe at around 9:00 p.m. (Beijing time) on Wednesday. The landmark result offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the universe predicted by Albert Einstein's general relativity. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)
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EN_01371766_0296
(190410) -- TOKYO, April 10, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Mareki Honma, a professor of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), shares information about the first-ever image of a black hole at press conference in Tokyo, Japan, April 10, 2019. The first photo successfully taken of a black hole was revealed on Wednesday by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) in Tokyo, Japan along with other five cities worldwide. (Xinhua/Du Xiaoyi)
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EN_01371766_0323
(190410) -- SANTIAGO, April 10, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Geoffrey Crew (L, Rear), research scientist at MIT Haystack Observatory, Violette Impellizzeri (L, Front), astronomer at the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), and Xavier Barcons (R), director general of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), attend a press conference in Santiago, capital of Chile, on April 10, 2019. Astronomers said here Wednesday that they captured the first image of a black hole, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of an unseeable cosmic object and its shadow. (Xinhua/Jorge Villegas)
EN_01371766_0324
EN_01371766_0324
(190410) -- SANTIAGO, April 10, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Geoffrey Crew (1st L), research scientist at MIT Haystack Observatory, Violette Impellizzeri (2nd L), astronomer at the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), and Xavier Barcons (3rd L), director general of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), attend a press conference in Santiago, capital of Chile, on April 10, 2019. Astronomers said here Wednesday that they captured the first image of a black hole, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of an unseeable cosmic object and its shadow. (Xinhua/Jorge Villegas)
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EN_01371766_0325
(190410) -- SANTIAGO, April 10, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Geoffrey Crew (1st L), research scientist at MIT Haystack Observatory, Violette Impellizzeri (2nd L), astronomer at the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), and Xavier Barcons (3rd L), director general of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), attend a press conference in Santiago, capital of Chile, on April 10, 2019. Astronomers said here Wednesday that they captured the first image of a black hole, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of an unseeable cosmic object and its shadow. (Xinhua/Jorge Villegas)
EN_01371766_0328
EN_01371766_0328
(190410) -- SANTIAGO, April 10, 2019 (Xinhua) -- An Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project press conference is held in Santiago, capital of Chile, on April 10, 2019. Astronomers said here Wednesday that they captured the first image of a black hole, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of an unseeable cosmic object and its shadow. (Xinhua/Jorge Villegas)
EN_01371766_0329
EN_01371766_0329
(190410) -- SANTIAGO, April 10, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Violette Impellizzeri (L), astronomer at the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), and Xavier Barcons, director general of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), attend a press conference in Santiago, capital of Chile, on April 10, 2019. Astronomers said here Wednesday that they captured the first image of a black hole, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of an unseeable cosmic object and its shadow. (Xinhua/Jorge Villegas)
EN_01371766_0330
EN_01371766_0330
(190410) -- SANTIAGO, April 10, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Geoffrey Crew (3rd R), research scientist at MIT Haystack Observatory, speaks at a press conference in Santiago, capital of Chile, on April 10, 2019. Astronomers said here Wednesday that they captured the first image of a black hole, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of an unseeable cosmic object and its shadow. (Xinhua/Jorge Villegas)
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EN_01371921_0086
(190411) -- BEIJING, April 11, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Photo provided by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) shows the first image of the black hole. (Xinhua/EHT)
EN_01371921_0087
EN_01371921_0087
(190411) -- BEIJING, April 11, 2019 (Xinhua) -- Chinese researchers discuss the imaging methods of the image of the black hole in Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SAO), in east China's Shanghai, April 9, 2019. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)
EN_01371762_1830
EN_01371762_1830
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan's Prof. Mareki Honma speaks during a press conference about capturing pictures of Black hole in Tokyo on April 10, 2019. International team of about 80 researchers including NAOJ revealed that they have succeeded, unveiling the first images of a black hole that were captured using combination of eight radio observatories.( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
JAPAN OUT
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National Astronomical Observatory of Japan's Prof. Mareki Honma speaks during a press conference about capturing pictures of Black hole in Tokyo on April 10, 2019. International team of about 80 researchers including NAOJ revealed that they have succeeded, unveiling the first images of a black hole that were captured using combination of eight radio observatories.( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
JAPAN OUT
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EN_01371762_1833
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan's Prof. Mareki Honma speaks during a press conference about capturing pictures of Black hole in Tokyo on April 10, 2019. International team of about 80 researchers including NAOJ revealed that they have succeeded, unveiling the first images of a black hole that were captured using combination of eight radio observatories.( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
JAPAN OUT
EN_01371762_1834
EN_01371762_1834
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan's Prof. Mareki Honma speaks during a press conference about capturing pictures of Black hole in Tokyo on April 10, 2019. International team of about 80 researchers including NAOJ revealed that they have succeeded, unveiling the first images of a black hole that were captured using combination of eight radio observatories.( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
JAPAN OUT
EN_01371762_1835
EN_01371762_1835
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan's Prof. Mareki Honma speaks during a press conference about capturing pictures of Black hole in Tokyo on April 10, 2019. International team of about 80 researchers including NAOJ revealed that they have succeeded, unveiling the first images of a black hole that were captured using combination of eight radio observatories.( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
JAPAN OUT
EN_01371762_1836
EN_01371762_1836
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan's Prof. Mareki Honma speaks during a press conference about capturing pictures of Black hole in Tokyo on April 10, 2019. International team of about 80 researchers including NAOJ revealed that they have succeeded, unveiling the first images of a black hole that were captured using combination of eight radio observatories.( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
JAPAN OUT
EN_01371918_0224
EN_01371918_0224
A Chinese astronomer introduces the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:bjl8634702
EN_01371918_0225
EN_01371918_0225
A Chinese astronomer introduces the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:bjl8634703
EN_01371918_0226
EN_01371918_0226
A Chinese astronomer introduces the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:bjl8634701
EN_01371918_0227
EN_01371918_0227
A Chinese astronomer introduces the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:bjl8634704
EN_01371918_0228
EN_01371918_0228
A Chinese astronomer introduces the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:bjl8634706
EN_01371918_0229
EN_01371918_0229
A Chinese astronomer introduces the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:bjl8634705
EN_01371918_0233
EN_01371918_0233
A Chinese astronomer introduces the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:20190410_308060
EN_01371918_0234
EN_01371918_0234
A Chinese astronomer introduces the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:20190410_308064
EN_01371918_0236
EN_01371918_0236
The first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster is displayed at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:20190410_308647
EN_01371918_0237
EN_01371918_0237
A Chinese astronomer introduces the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:20190410_410079
EN_01371918_0238
EN_01371918_0238
College students from Chinese Academy of Sciences takes selfies with the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:20190410_410815
EN_01371918_0239
EN_01371918_0239
College students from Chinese Academy of Sciences takes selfies with the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:20190410_308640
EN_01371918_0240
EN_01371918_0240
A Chinese astronomer introduces the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:20190410_410077
EN_01371918_0242
EN_01371918_0242
A Chinese astronomer introduces the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:20190410_607495
EN_01371918_0244
EN_01371918_0244
A Chinese astronomer introduces the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:bjl8634699
EN_01371918_0246
EN_01371918_0246
A Chinese astronomer introduces the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:20190410_807282
EN_01371918_0248
EN_01371918_0248
A Chinese astronomer introduces the first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:20190410_807780
EN_01371918_0249
EN_01371918_0249
The first-ever image of a black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster is displayed at a press conference in Shanghai, China, 10 April 2019. The first-ever image of a black hole, a joint effort of more than 200 astronomers worldwide, including 16 from the Chinese mainland, was released on Wednesday. It was the first visible representation of what are considered the most extreme objects in the universe. The image depicts the black hole at the heart of Messier 87, a massive, distant galaxy in the Virgo galaxy cluster. It resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the sun. It puts to the test Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity put forward in 1915, which allows for a prediction of the size and shape of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope, a globe-spanning array of eight ground-based radio telescopes, was used to observe the black hole. It took an international scientific team to capture the paradigm-shifting image, which was announced through coordinated news conferences around the world. The telescope array used a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry, which synchronized the radio telescopes. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:20190410_607992
EN_01371918_0718
EN_01371918_0718
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan's Prof. Mareki Honma speaks during a press conference about capturing pictures of Black hole in Tokyo on April 10, 2019. International team of about 80 researchers including NAOJ revealed that they have succeeded, unveiling the first images of a black hole that were captured using combination of eight radio observatories.( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
JAPAN OUT
EN_01371918_0719
EN_01371918_0719
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan's Prof. Mareki Honma speaks during a press conference about capturing pictures of Black hole in Tokyo on April 10, 2019. International team of about 80 researchers including NAOJ revealed that they have succeeded, unveiling the first images of a black hole that were captured using combination of eight radio observatories.( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
JAPAN OUT
EN_01371918_0762
EN_01371918_0762
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan's Prof. Mareki Honma speaks during a press conference about capturing pictures of Black hole in Tokyo on April 10, 2019. International team of about 80 researchers including NAOJ revealed that they have succeeded, unveiling the first images of a black hole that were captured using combination of eight radio observatories.( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
JAPAN OUT
EN_01371918_0763
EN_01371918_0763
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan's Prof. Mareki Honma speaks during a press conference about capturing pictures of Black hole in Tokyo on April 10, 2019. International team of about 80 researchers including NAOJ revealed that they have succeeded, unveiling the first images of a black hole that were captured using combination of eight radio observatories.( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
JAPAN OUT
EN_01371903_0010
EN_01371903_0010
Hand Out Photo - Scientists have obtained the first image of a black hole, using Event Horizon Telescope observations of the center of the galaxy M87. The image, released on April 10, 2019, shows a bright ring formed as light bends in the intense gravity around a black hole that is 6.5 billion times more massive than the Sun. This long-sought image provides the strongest evidence to date for the existence of supermassive black holes and opens a new window onto the study of black holes, their event horizons, and gravity. Photo by Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration via ABACAPRESS.COM
EN_01371903_0011
EN_01371903_0011
Hand Out Photo - Scientists have obtained the first image of a black hole, using Event Horizon Telescope observations of the center of the galaxy M87. The image, released on April 10, 2019, shows a bright ring formed as light bends in the intense gravity around a black hole that is 6.5 billion times more massive than the Sun. This long-sought image provides the strongest evidence to date for the existence of supermassive black holes and opens a new window onto the study of black holes, their event horizons, and gravity. Photo by Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration via ABACAPRESS.COM
EN_01371955_0003
EN_01371955_0003
Astronomers have taken the first ever image of a black hole, which measures 40 billion km across. It is 500 million trillion km away and was photographed by a network of eight telescopes across the world. The image - captured by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a network of eight linked telescopes - shows an intensely bright "ring of fire", surrounding a perfectly circular dark hole. Please credit EHT Collaboration / MEGA. 10 Apr 2019 Pictured: First ever black hole image released. Photo credit: EHT Collaboration/MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
World Rights
EN_01371955_0004
EN_01371955_0004
Hand Out Photo - Scientists have obtained the first image of a black hole, using Event Horizon Telescope observations of the center of the galaxy M87. The image, released on April 10, 2019, shows a bright ring formed as light bends in the intense gravity around a black hole that is 6.5 billion times more massive than the Sun. This long-sought image provides the strongest evidence to date for the existence of supermassive black holes and opens a new window onto the study of black holes, their event horizons, and gravity. Photo by Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration via ABACAPRESS.COM
EN_01371763_0984
EN_01371763_0984
A handout photo provided by the European Southern Observatory on April 10, 2019 shows the first photograph of a black hole and its fiery halo, released by Event Horizon Telescope astronomers (EHT), which is the "most direct proof of their existence," one of the project's lead scientists told AFP. (Photo by - / EUROPEAN SOUTHERN OBSERVATORY / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUROPEAN SOUTHERN OBSERVATORY" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUROPEAN SOUTHERN OBSERVATORY" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

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